City: Mini pigs may get to stay


City council reconsiders swine ban

By Nathan Kraatz - nkraatz@civitasmedia.com



Nathan Kraatz | Wilmington News Journal Wilmington Mayor Randy Riley speaks at Wilmington Concil’s meeting Thrusday evening at the Wilmington Municipal Building.


WILMINGTON — Wilmington’s illegal resident is in the process of being granted amnesty.

Vincent, the miniature Vietnamese pot-belly pig, is illegal to have in city limits. Thursday night, Wilmington Council passed a first reading to amend the ordinance prohibiting swine in the city limits.

Two more readings must occur before the ordinance is amended.

Vincent was a gift from family members, but his owners found that Wilmington had a law prohibiting owning a pig and contacted Council.

The amended ordinance will still prohibit all swine except miniature pigs.

Pigs weighing more than 55 pounds at three years of age would be prohibited, as would be pig breeding. Pigs must also be spayed or neutered, kept indoors and as a pet (not for consumption) and, when outside, on a leash.

Still, Vincent and his owners will be happy when Vincent is a legal resident of Wilmington.

“It’s an important part of the family now,” said Rob Jaehnig, chair of the judiciary committee.

Wilmington resident Paul Hunter asked if anyone challenged the $600,000 “slush fund” that’s part of the solid waste plan. Clinton County Solid Waste Director Jeff Walls said the money was there to pay down the final years of operations.

“It’s a projection of the monies you’re going to be needing for the next 15 years,” said Council member Mark McKay. “In reality, they come out at like $0 at the end of that 15 year period.”

Jaehnig, who also chairs the city’s solid waste committee, said the city “demanded” no rate increases. He said there aren’t any planned rate increases until the plan is up for review.

Council also:

• Appropriated $50,000 from the Urban Development Assistance Grant fund to provide for a revolving loan to Bisig Automotive. The loan was approved last year.

• Transferred $1,000 from police K-9 supplies to police education to pay for training related to K-9 Karson.

• Met in executive session to consider the compensation of elected officials. Those who will be taking office January 1 were allowed to stay.

• Approved a first reading on a resolution submitting a grant proposal to the U.S. Department of Transportation and a first reading on authorizing Riley to enter into a contract with the Ohio Department of Transportation. The grant and contract, if awarded, should help with operating and capital expenses, according to Phil Floyd, director of the Wilmington Transit System. A public hearing will be held on the third hearing, Floyd said.

During the public comments portion of council’s meeting:

Hunter said Riley’s comments in a recent Wilmington News Journal article about the potential future for the city landfill “should raise a red flag among the council and local citizens that are opposed to commercialization of the landfill.”

“Extend the life of the current landfill cell using some of the methods suggested by myself and Mr. (Braden) Dunham,” Hunter suggested. “Pay down the fund’s debt and start accumulating capital for the eventual closure of the facility.”

In the article Hunter referred to, Riley said the city already had plans in preparation for a landfill expansion, which Wilmington Service Director Larry Reinsmith said would take several years to complete. Landfill Superintendent Braden Dunham estimated that the landfill’s current and only cell had seven years of life left.

First ward council-elect Jonathan McKay said a resident expressed pleasure at seeing more of a police presence in the community.

Reach Nathan Kraatz at 937-382-2574, ext. 2510 or on Twitter @NathanKraatz.

Nathan Kraatz | Wilmington News Journal Wilmington Mayor Randy Riley speaks at Wilmington Concil’s meeting Thrusday evening at the Wilmington Municipal Building.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2015/07/web1_DSCF09783.jpgNathan Kraatz | Wilmington News Journal Wilmington Mayor Randy Riley speaks at Wilmington Concil’s meeting Thrusday evening at the Wilmington Municipal Building.
City council reconsiders swine ban

By Nathan Kraatz

nkraatz@civitasmedia.com