Kasich makes it official


Invokes Wilmington’s turnaround in speech

By Dustin Ensinger - densinger@civitasmedia.com



Gov. John Kasich, his wife, Karen and daughters Emma and Reese take the stage at the Ohio Union on the campus of Ohio State University Tuesday where he formally announced his intention to enter the fray for the Republican nomination for the presidency. He is the 16th major candidate in a historically crowded field.


Dustin Ensinger | Civitas Media

Following is an excerpt from Kasich’s speech in which he discusses Wilmington:

“My father used to say that he would go down to the store and get some food for the family and the guy would say, “We’ll put it on your bill.” There was no bill. That’s what it took for America to get through the Depression.

And you all remember that crystal clear morning and the horror we felt on 9/11.

But guess what? We’ve always got through it, because the testing is what makes you stronger. It’s the challenges that make you better. I have lived through them, and I have become stronger for them, and America has become stronger for them.

And here’s how we’ve done it: by staying together. Not by dividing each other but by staying together with our eyes on the horizon, with our eyes on the horizon, about the future.

We have a little town in Ohio called Wilmington. They followed that formula.

Let me tell you about these folks. They played by the rules — worked every day, highly productive, teamwork — and one day, an employer said, ‘We’re leaving. We’re out of here.’

And thousands of people, thousands of hardworking, God-fearing people like your neighbors, went from getting a paycheck on a Friday afternoon to visiting a food pantry so they could feed their kids.

I was down there in 2010 after this earthquake — economic earthquake hit Wilmington. We had a campaign bus. My wife was with me.

We walked through that food pantry. We looked at the people and preachers and civil servants and leaders and caregivers. They were at the food pantry, but they hadn’t lost any hope, because they had their eyes on the horizon.

We got back on the bus — I will never forget it as long as I live — we got back on — on the bus, and I said, “Folks, do you understand” — some of them had been with me for a long time, so they got it. But some of the others were rookies.

I said, “Do you understand what we are doing here? This isn’t a political campaign.” And by the way, either will this be. “This is not a political campaign.

“Did you see those people? Did you see the tears in their eyes? Did you see them hugging their children? Did you see them not hopeless? We’re going to join in, and we’re going to help them, because it is our job and our mission as human beings, as children of God, to work with them, to lift them.”

And guess what? And guess what?

And in Wilmington today, the sun’s coming up. I told them that the sun would come up again. It hasn’t reached its zenith, but the sun is rising, and the sun is going to rise to the zenith in America again. I promise you, it will happen.”

COLUMBUS — After months of visiting early presidential primary states, Gov. John Kasich made his bid for the presidency official Tuesday.

And one of his major points about economic recovery and the American spirit focused on Wilmington’s recovery.

In speaking about people banding together and rising above economic hardships, Kasich said, “And here’s how we’ve done it: by staying together. Not by dividing each other but by staying together with our eyes on the horizon, with our eyes on the horizon, about the future. We have a little town in Ohio called Wilmington. They followed that formula.”

Kasich then detailed the struggles the area endured before finally rebounding.

In announcing his candidacy, Kasich, became the 16th major contender in a crowded GOP primary field.

“I am here to ask for your prayers, your support and your efforts, because I have decided to run for president of the United States,” Kasich told the crowd of about 2,000 at his announcement at Ohio State University in Columbus.

In a speech devoid of the attacks on President Barack Obama or likely Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton, Kasich made a case for the presidency based on his experience in both federal and state government and the private sector.

“I believe I do have the skills, and I have the experience,” he said, touting his role in reducing wasteful spending at the Pentagon and achieving a balanced federal budget in 1997 during his tenure in Congress.

He vowed to push for a constitutional amendment to balance the federal budget if elected.

He also touched on his success as governor, saying he took over a state government with virtually no money in the rainy day fund and turned it into a surplus of about $800 million, all while cutting state income taxes by $5 billion.

“We’re going to take the lessons of the heartland and straighten out Washington, D.C.,” he said.

But for dozens of protesters who stood along High Street during the announcement, the idea of Kasich taking policies nationwide was not a comforting thought.

Kasich, who has expanded Medicare under the Affordable Care Act and supported the implementation of Common Core educational standards, at times sounded much different than many of his fellow Republican contenders.

At several points during his speech, he touched on the need to help those who are often disadvantaged in American society, including the poor, the African-American community and the disabled.

“If we’re not born to serve others, what are we born to do?” he asked, later adding, “The Lord will record what you’ve done for another in the book of life.”

Kasich channeled former president and conservative icon Ronald Reagan to close his speech.

“The light of a city on a hill cannot be hidden. America is that city and you are the light,” he said.

The speech comes 16 years to the month after Kasich dropped out of the 2000 Republican primary, and recent polls have shown him lagging behind most of the other candidates in the 2016 field.

Kasich said his entire career has been built on overcoming obstacles.

“All my life people have told me you can’t do something,” he said.

His entry nearly rounds out an unusually diverse Republican lineup with two Hispanics, an African-American, one woman and several younger candidates alongside older white men. So many are running that it’s unclear Kasich will qualify for the GOP’s first debate in his home state in just two weeks.

In recent months, he’s made trips to New Hampshire, South Carolina, Iowa, New York and Michigan, and will be returning to early voting states. His allies at the political organization New Day for America reported raising $11.5 million on his behalf before his entry into the race.

This report contains information from the Associated Press.

Gov. John Kasich, his wife, Karen and daughters Emma and Reese take the stage at the Ohio Union on the campus of Ohio State University Tuesday where he formally announced his intention to enter the fray for the Republican nomination for the presidency. He is the 16th major candidate in a historically crowded field.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2015/07/web1_DSC_33412.jpgGov. John Kasich, his wife, Karen and daughters Emma and Reese take the stage at the Ohio Union on the campus of Ohio State University Tuesday where he formally announced his intention to enter the fray for the Republican nomination for the presidency. He is the 16th major candidate in a historically crowded field. Dustin Ensinger | Civitas Media
Invokes Wilmington’s turnaround in speech

By Dustin Ensinger

densinger@civitasmedia.com

Following is an excerpt from Kasich’s speech in which he discusses Wilmington:

“My father used to say that he would go down to the store and get some food for the family and the guy would say, “We’ll put it on your bill.” There was no bill. That’s what it took for America to get through the Depression.

And you all remember that crystal clear morning and the horror we felt on 9/11.

But guess what? We’ve always got through it, because the testing is what makes you stronger. It’s the challenges that make you better. I have lived through them, and I have become stronger for them, and America has become stronger for them.

And here’s how we’ve done it: by staying together. Not by dividing each other but by staying together with our eyes on the horizon, with our eyes on the horizon, about the future.

We have a little town in Ohio called Wilmington. They followed that formula.

Let me tell you about these folks. They played by the rules — worked every day, highly productive, teamwork — and one day, an employer said, ‘We’re leaving. We’re out of here.’

And thousands of people, thousands of hardworking, God-fearing people like your neighbors, went from getting a paycheck on a Friday afternoon to visiting a food pantry so they could feed their kids.

I was down there in 2010 after this earthquake — economic earthquake hit Wilmington. We had a campaign bus. My wife was with me.

We walked through that food pantry. We looked at the people and preachers and civil servants and leaders and caregivers. They were at the food pantry, but they hadn’t lost any hope, because they had their eyes on the horizon.

We got back on the bus — I will never forget it as long as I live — we got back on — on the bus, and I said, “Folks, do you understand” — some of them had been with me for a long time, so they got it. But some of the others were rookies.

I said, “Do you understand what we are doing here? This isn’t a political campaign.” And by the way, either will this be. “This is not a political campaign.

“Did you see those people? Did you see the tears in their eyes? Did you see them hugging their children? Did you see them not hopeless? We’re going to join in, and we’re going to help them, because it is our job and our mission as human beings, as children of God, to work with them, to lift them.”

And guess what? And guess what?

And in Wilmington today, the sun’s coming up. I told them that the sun would come up again. It hasn’t reached its zenith, but the sun is rising, and the sun is going to rise to the zenith in America again. I promise you, it will happen.”