The land of the free: More and more eagles are upon us


Eagles are common sites locally

By Tom Barr - tbarr@civitasmedia.com



Joyce Arrasmith of Sabina said she has seen eagles 17 times around Cowan Lake in the past year.


Beth Ellis took photos — of what some have described as a golden eagle and others as a juvenile bald eagle — on Cherrybend Road near Cherrybend Pheasant Farm and Melvin, Ohio. She spotted a bald eagle a few days ago and said it was definitely following the waterfowl congregating at the Melvin Stone quarry.


Beth Ellis | Courtesy photo

Joyce Arrasmith of Sabina said she has seen eagles 17 times around Cowan Lake in the past year.


Joyce Arrasmith | Courtesy photo

Joyce Arrasmith of Sabina said she has seen eagles 17 times around Cowan Lake in the past year.


Joyce Arrasmith | Courtesy photo

Beth Ellis took photos — of what some have described as a golden eagle and others as a juvenile bald eagle — on Cherrybend Road near Cherrybend Pheasant Farm and Melvin, Ohio. She spotted a bald eagle a few days ago and said it was definitely following the waterfowl congregating at the Melvin Stone quarry.


Beth Ellis | Courtesy photo

Beth Ellis took photos — of what some have described as a golden eagle and others as a juvenile bald eagle — on Cherrybend Road near Cherrybend Pheasant Farm and Melvin, Ohio. She spotted a bald eagle a few days ago and said it was definitely following the waterfowl congregating at the Melvin Stone quarry.


Beth Ellis | Courtesy photo

Phil Hufford shot this photo near the bypass and Wal-Mart in Wilmington. He said they gather by the pond.


Phil Hufford | Courtesy photo

Keith Zurface took this photo along Sabina Road.


Keith Zurface | Courtesy photo

Kristie Cleaver captured this photo of an eagle off Middleboro Road near 22&3.


Kristie Cleaver | Courtesy photo

If you want to see North America’s largest congregation of bald eagles, head a bit west and north. In “mid-October through December on the Chilkat River near Haines, Alaska, the salmon run attracts three to four thousand bald eagles” along a four-mile stretch. — www.baldeagleinfo.com

CLINTON COUNTY — The Eagles have landed — and we’re not talking about the tribute band coming soon to the Murphy Theatre.

We’re talking the apex predator of North American raptors that local residents see soaring above Clinton County, and much of Ohio, on a near-daily basis.

Eagles — especially bald eagles — have become more prevalent in the last few years. Area residents told the News Journal via Facebook that they’ve spotted bald eagles everywhere from Wilmington to Sabina to Blanchester to Martinsville, and to Cowan Lake, Caesar Creek Lake and points in-between.

Both bald eagles and golden eagles — once considered endangered species — have made a comeback, although they are still protected under the Eagle Act, according to the US Fish & Wildlife Service.

Bald eagles can live 20-30 years in the wild, and they mate for life, according to the National Wildlife Federation. Their nests are usually 50 to 120 feet high in a sturdy tree.

“It’s not uncommon to see them throughout the state at this time of the year,” said Kathy Garza-Behr, Wildlife Communications Specialist at the Ohio Department of Natural Resources District 5 Headquarters in Xenia. “They will generally be seen near large inland bodies of water or along river and creek corridors. With the warm winter, the water remains open, allowing them to feed on their main food source of fish.

“Caesar Creek Lake and Cowan Lake would be ideal areas to observe the bird currently. Nesting pairs will begin mating in about mid-February and many pairs may already be back in the state prepping for another breeding season.”

According to the 2016 ODNR annual bald eagle nesting survey, biologists calculated that, based on a survey of sample areas, there were approximately 207 eagle nests within the state in 2016, which was the same estimate as 2015.

In the past five years, the estimate of number of nests has averaged 203 per year. The average number of young in 2016 year was estimated at 327, which is above the five-year estimate of 294.

“Overall, bald eagles continue to flourish in Ohio,” according to the survey report. “In recent years the population seems to have stabilized, with only a 3 percent increase over the past 10 years. As a result of this success, management by the division remains minimal, with primary duties being working with rehabilitators that help injured birds recover, and enforcement of protective state and federal laws, such as the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act.”

Joyce Arrasmith of Sabina said she has seen eagles 17 times around Cowan Lake in the past year.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/01/web1_eagle-set-to-fly-joyce-arrasmith-2.jpgJoyce Arrasmith of Sabina said she has seen eagles 17 times around Cowan Lake in the past year.

Beth Ellis took photos — of what some have described as a golden eagle and others as a juvenile bald eagle — on Cherrybend Road near Cherrybend Pheasant Farm and Melvin, Ohio. She spotted a bald eagle a few days ago and said it was definitely following the waterfowl congregating at the Melvin Stone quarry.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/01/web1_eagle-3-2.jpgBeth Ellis took photos — of what some have described as a golden eagle and others as a juvenile bald eagle — on Cherrybend Road near Cherrybend Pheasant Farm and Melvin, Ohio. She spotted a bald eagle a few days ago and said it was definitely following the waterfowl congregating at the Melvin Stone quarry. Beth Ellis | Courtesy photo

Joyce Arrasmith of Sabina said she has seen eagles 17 times around Cowan Lake in the past year.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/01/web1_eagle-perched-joyce-arrasmith-2.jpgJoyce Arrasmith of Sabina said she has seen eagles 17 times around Cowan Lake in the past year. Joyce Arrasmith | Courtesy photo

Joyce Arrasmith of Sabina said she has seen eagles 17 times around Cowan Lake in the past year.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/01/web1_eagle-flying-blue-sky-joyce-arrasmith-2.jpgJoyce Arrasmith of Sabina said she has seen eagles 17 times around Cowan Lake in the past year. Joyce Arrasmith | Courtesy photo

Beth Ellis took photos — of what some have described as a golden eagle and others as a juvenile bald eagle — on Cherrybend Road near Cherrybend Pheasant Farm and Melvin, Ohio. She spotted a bald eagle a few days ago and said it was definitely following the waterfowl congregating at the Melvin Stone quarry.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/01/web1_eagle-1-2.jpgBeth Ellis took photos — of what some have described as a golden eagle and others as a juvenile bald eagle — on Cherrybend Road near Cherrybend Pheasant Farm and Melvin, Ohio. She spotted a bald eagle a few days ago and said it was definitely following the waterfowl congregating at the Melvin Stone quarry. Beth Ellis | Courtesy photo

Beth Ellis took photos — of what some have described as a golden eagle and others as a juvenile bald eagle — on Cherrybend Road near Cherrybend Pheasant Farm and Melvin, Ohio. She spotted a bald eagle a few days ago and said it was definitely following the waterfowl congregating at the Melvin Stone quarry.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/01/web1_eagle-2-2.jpgBeth Ellis took photos — of what some have described as a golden eagle and others as a juvenile bald eagle — on Cherrybend Road near Cherrybend Pheasant Farm and Melvin, Ohio. She spotted a bald eagle a few days ago and said it was definitely following the waterfowl congregating at the Melvin Stone quarry. Beth Ellis | Courtesy photo

Phil Hufford shot this photo near the bypass and Wal-Mart in Wilmington. He said they gather by the pond.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/01/web1_Phil-Hufford-west-side-of-bypass-by-walmart-2.jpgPhil Hufford shot this photo near the bypass and Wal-Mart in Wilmington. He said they gather by the pond. Phil Hufford | Courtesy photo

Keith Zurface took this photo along Sabina Road.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/01/web1_Keith-Zurface-May-Sabina-Road-2.jpgKeith Zurface took this photo along Sabina Road. Keith Zurface | Courtesy photo

Kristie Cleaver captured this photo of an eagle off Middleboro Road near 22&3.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/01/web1_Kristie-Cleaver-Middlebor-Rd-off-22and3-2.jpgKristie Cleaver captured this photo of an eagle off Middleboro Road near 22&3. Kristie Cleaver | Courtesy photo
Eagles are common sites locally

By Tom Barr

tbarr@civitasmedia.com

If you want to see North America’s largest congregation of bald eagles, head a bit west and north. In “mid-October through December on the Chilkat River near Haines, Alaska, the salmon run attracts three to four thousand bald eagles” along a four-mile stretch. — www.baldeagleinfo.com