Kerry Steed, Paul Butler and Josh Riley: There are reasons to keep thinking back to 9/11


WILMINGTON — At the 16th annual local observance of the Sept. 11 terrorists’ attacks, the speaker gave his answer to the person who didn’t know Clinton County continues to hold an early-morning remembrance event.

Clinton County Commissioners President Kerry R. Steed said one reason to keep publicly and formally commemorating 9/11 is to remember “innocent lives lost.” And another important purpose, he said, is to remind ourselves that the American people have the capacity to care and to have compassion and faith.

As an example, first responders such as firefighters and police officers “run toward danger, and not away from it,” the commissioner noted.

American Legion Post 49 member Paul Butler, in the invocation, prayed Monday that we hold no malice. He further asked that Americans remember the patriotic unity that occurred in the country in the days and months following 9/11.

Alluding to Hurricane Irma, downgraded Monday to a tropical storm, Butler pointed out that first responders and National Guard personnel were again in harm’s way and again were helping victims.

Wilmington Police Chief Detective Josh Riley, who opened the program, also spoke about the first responders of Sept. 11.

That day people “covered in gray ash” from the explosions and fires of airplane strikes into buildings were met by the first responders and by ordinary citizens, said Riley. Those rescuers and helpers exhibited kindness, patience, respect and compassion, the detective added.

And though U.S. citizens have their differences, said Riley, in the end they all are Americans.

Reach Gary Huffenberger at 937-556-5768.

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“Members of the Wilmington Fire Department bow their heads in prayer during the Monday morning “Day of Service and Remembrance” event outside Wilmington City Hall.
http://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/09/web1_prayer_p_f-1.jpg“Members of the Wilmington Fire Department bow their heads in prayer during the Monday morning “Day of Service and Remembrance” event outside Wilmington City Hall. Gary Huffenberger | News Journal

Wilmington firefighter Ed Meyers plays the bagpipes Monday during the solemn remembrance of 9/11. The commemoration included other sounds such as the tolling of the Freedom Bell by Clinton County Commissioner Brenda Woods, “The Star Spangled Banner” sung by Bekah Muchmore, a 21-gun salute by the American Legion Post 49 Memorial Squad, and “Taps” presented by bugler Alex Totten.
http://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/09/web1_bagpipes_p_f-1.jpgWilmington firefighter Ed Meyers plays the bagpipes Monday during the solemn remembrance of 9/11. The commemoration included other sounds such as the tolling of the Freedom Bell by Clinton County Commissioner Brenda Woods, “The Star Spangled Banner” sung by Bekah Muchmore, a 21-gun salute by the American Legion Post 49 Memorial Squad, and “Taps” presented by bugler Alex Totten. Gary Huffenberger | News Journal

Outside the city building, the American flag was lowered to half-staff Monday in remembrance of 9/11. From left are members of the Clinton County Sheriff’s Office command staff: Colonel and Chief Deputy Brian L. Prickett, Lieutenant Michael N. Kassinos and Lieutenant Michael T. Wahl.
http://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/09/web1_salute_p_f-1.jpgOutside the city building, the American flag was lowered to half-staff Monday in remembrance of 9/11. From left are members of the Clinton County Sheriff’s Office command staff: Colonel and Chief Deputy Brian L. Prickett, Lieutenant Michael N. Kassinos and Lieutenant Michael T. Wahl. Gary Huffenberger | News Journal

By Gary Huffenberger

ghuffenberger@wnewsj.com

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