ALICE training: Proactivity and brain over brawn


Officials face ‘active shooter’ scenarios

By John Hamilton - jhamilton@wnewsj.com



Annie Kennedy, left, of North Olmsted Schools and Brian Fletcher of the Batavia Police Department take part in an exercise to overpower a potential gunman during the second day of the ALICE training session on Wednesday at Clinton-Massie High School.

Annie Kennedy, left, of North Olmsted Schools and Brian Fletcher of the Batavia Police Department take part in an exercise to overpower a potential gunman during the second day of the ALICE training session on Wednesday at Clinton-Massie High School.


John Hamilton | News Journal

George Hunter, far left, an ALICE national trainer, instructs educators, law enforcement personnel, and others on possible tactics to overpower a potential active shooter during the second day of ALICE training at Clinton-Massie High School on Wednesday.


John Hamilton | News Journal

CLARKSVILLE — Proactivity was the main theme in the ALICE training session for local emergency personnel, school officials and private companies at Clinton-Massie High School on Wednesday.

ALICE (Alert Lockdown Inform Counter Evacuate) was developed to help people “participate in their own survival” and “give them proactive based options if they find themselves in a violent critical incident,” according to George Hunter, an ALICE national trainer.

These exercises are meant to give educators and law enforcement officials possible tactics to use while first responding or en route to an active shooter scenario.

Among the exercises was overwhelming the shooter’s senses with movement, loud noises, and in some way being proactive in the scenario. These students will then take what they’ve learned and pass it on to their respective associates.

Hunter told around 40 people in the classroom that’s its not about the brawn, but the brain. Hunter highlighted what’s called an OODA (Observe Orient Decide Act) loop — a military strategy by U.S. Air Force Col. John Boyd, which shows how agility can overcome raw power from a human opponent.

“With the classic lockdown, we have someone with very little to no experience with a gun, in a minute and 30 seconds, shoot 41 people … we know we would’ve lost 20 people,” said Hunter when discussing possible situations. “They weren’t allowed to move in that first scenario … once they got involved with their own survival, the longest scenario lasted was 28 seconds, and the drastic fatal shots went down.”

Hunter hopes law enforcement officials realize what school systems are doing as first responders are on their way, and he hopes that teachers and administrators take what the program is about and pass on what they learned to their students and other faculty members.

Among the group was East Clinton Superintendent Eric Magee, who spoke highly of ALICE saying it provides the avenues needed to help in an active shooter situation.

“I think one of the main takeaways is the fact that as educators and students in the classroom, when there’s an active shooter, we are the first responders,” said Magee. “It’s our responsibility to act and respond appropriately.”

Annie Kennedy, left, of North Olmsted Schools and Brian Fletcher of the Batavia Police Department take part in an exercise to overpower a potential gunman during the second day of the ALICE training session on Wednesday at Clinton-Massie High School.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2019/04/web1_DSC_0516.jpgAnnie Kennedy, left, of North Olmsted Schools and Brian Fletcher of the Batavia Police Department take part in an exercise to overpower a potential gunman during the second day of the ALICE training session on Wednesday at Clinton-Massie High School. John Hamilton | News Journal

George Hunter, far left, an ALICE national trainer, instructs educators, law enforcement personnel, and others on possible tactics to overpower a potential active shooter during the second day of ALICE training at Clinton-Massie High School on Wednesday.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2019/04/web1_DSC_0528.jpgGeorge Hunter, far left, an ALICE national trainer, instructs educators, law enforcement personnel, and others on possible tactics to overpower a potential active shooter during the second day of ALICE training at Clinton-Massie High School on Wednesday. John Hamilton | News Journal
Officials face ‘active shooter’ scenarios

By John Hamilton

jhamilton@wnewsj.com

Reach John Hamilton at 937-382-2574

Reach John Hamilton at 937-382-2574