WC to host program on holiday traditions


During the 2017 event, Chip Murdock, right, director of diversity and inclusion at WC, explains some of Kwanzaa’s finer points along with Black Student Initiative members Kelly Angevine and Sterling Clark, the latter of whom is holding a ceremonial skekere, a rhythm percussion instrument from Africa.

During the 2017 event, Chip Murdock, right, director of diversity and inclusion at WC, explains some of Kwanzaa’s finer points along with Black Student Initiative members Kelly Angevine and Sterling Clark, the latter of whom is holding a ceremonial skekere, a rhythm percussion instrument from Africa.


Courtesy photo

WILMINGTON — December is a time in which many persons of various faiths, ethnicities and nationalities observe holidays and special traditions.

Wilmington College is hosting its annual Winter Holiday Celebration program highlighting some of these religious, cultural and secular events on Monday, Dec. 2 at 6:30 p.m. in the McCoy Room of Kelly Center. The community is welcome to attend.

While the observance of Christmas is the central focus for most Americans, many also observe Christian Advent, the Jewish tradition of Hanukkah and the now 52-year-old, African American custom of Kwanzaa, among others. Also, Christmas is observed with traditions unique to various nationalities, which will be shared by some of the college’s international students.

The program is designed to offer a chance in which to learn about the holiday season from a number of perspectives. This year’s program will feature insight into: Diwali, Hanukkah, holiday traditions in Scandinavia, Kwanza, and Advent/Christmas and Epiphany.

Event sponsors include the offices of Diversity and Inclusion, and Campus Ministry.

During the 2017 event, Chip Murdock, right, director of diversity and inclusion at WC, explains some of Kwanzaa’s finer points along with Black Student Initiative members Kelly Angevine and Sterling Clark, the latter of whom is holding a ceremonial skekere, a rhythm percussion instrument from Africa.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2019/11/web1_Holiday_Kwanzaa_p.jpgDuring the 2017 event, Chip Murdock, right, director of diversity and inclusion at WC, explains some of Kwanzaa’s finer points along with Black Student Initiative members Kelly Angevine and Sterling Clark, the latter of whom is holding a ceremonial skekere, a rhythm percussion instrument from Africa. Courtesy photo