WC Aggies’ Annual Livestock Judging attracts record 1,402 participants


By Randy Sarvis - Wilmington College



High School students judge sheep in the general livestock arena. For the duration of the competition, the student groups rotate to judge various corrals of animals.

High School students judge sheep in the general livestock arena. For the duration of the competition, the student groups rotate to judge various corrals of animals.


Courtesy photo

A record-breaking 1,402 participants, representing 97 high schools from Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky, honed their skills in agronomy and judging swine, sheep, goats, equine, beef and dairy cattle Wednesday at the Wilmington College Aggies’ 62nd annual Livestock Judging Contest.

Billed as the largest competition of its kind east of the Mississippi, WC’s competition represents real life application and an experiential learning experience for both the high school students and WC’s agriculture students that stage the event.

Winners included: General Livestock — West Liberty-Salem (team) and Dillon Peck from Miller City (individual); Dairy — Fairlawn-UVCC and Gloria Terry from Mechanicsburg; and Agronomy — Miami Trace and Lahni Stachler from Miami Trace. Equine results are pending.

Rachel Jordan, president of the Aggies, declared the contest “a huge success” for both her organization, which staged the mega-event at the Clark County Fairgrounds, and also for all those high school students who are now better prepared for judging at county fairs, 4-H contests and other upcoming competitions.

“This is really exciting for us as a college,” Jordan said. “Not only is this contest a way for us agriculture students to give back to a program that means so much to us but it’s a great way for high school students to see a glimpse of what Wilmington College has to offer.”

Jordan said the judging experience is a “true testament” to the College’s hands-on living mantra.

“I hope each student left today’s contest with a better knowledge of how to judge their respected areas, along with a stronger sense of confidence in themselves,” she added, noting many of her WC peers once participated in the Aggies’ competition.

“We understand the time and effort these kids put into practicing for these contests, and we want to give back,” she said. “Not only are we orchestrating a large contest, but we are preparing the next generation of Ag professionals to be their very best. “

High School students judge sheep in the general livestock arena. For the duration of the competition, the student groups rotate to judge various corrals of animals.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2020/03/web1_LivestockJudging-20.jpgHigh School students judge sheep in the general livestock arena. For the duration of the competition, the student groups rotate to judge various corrals of animals. Courtesy photo

By Randy Sarvis

Wilmington College