Clinton County Legacy Fund grant to improve Fire Training Center


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Clinton County Legacy Fund Committee members join Clinton-Warren Joint Fire District staff to celebrate the awarding of a $45,000 Legacy Fund grant to the fire district based in Clarksville. From left are Michelle Morrison, Joe Reiley, Mike McCarty, Chief Bob Wysong, Andrew Wysong, Janet Dixon, Joe Hete, and Tony Long.

Clinton County Legacy Fund Committee members join Clinton-Warren Joint Fire District staff to celebrate the awarding of a $45,000 Legacy Fund grant to the fire district based in Clarksville. From left are Michelle Morrison, Joe Reiley, Mike McCarty, Chief Bob Wysong, Andrew Wysong, Janet Dixon, Joe Hete, and Tony Long.


Gary Huffenberger | News Journal

A $45,000 Clinton County Legacy Fund grant awarded to the Clinton-Warren Joint Fire District will allow it to expand and improve the available training for firefighters and emergency medical technicians (EMTs) — and not just for first-responders in its own department, but throughout the county and region.

The grant dollars will go toward buying training aids for the existing Fire Training Center located at the Clarksville home base of the Clinton-Warren Joint Fire District. The Fire Training Center already includes a three-story, 40-foot tall burn tower and a classroom to provide training and learning facilities for current and future firefighters.

One training aid to be acquired with the grant funds is a digital fire training panel that simulates all classes of fires, with a digital laser nozzle and weighted hose line. This device will enable instruction without flowing water or having a live fire, said Clinton-Warren Joint Fire District Chief Bob Wysong.

“All pieces interact with each other from the burning stage to simulating extinguishment,” added Wysong.

The fire district also will purchase different rescue manikins — some that even simulate human body temperature and talk.

These manikins can be used for training in search-and-rescue, vehicle extrication, farm accidents, grain entrapment, and other scenarios, the chief said.

They weigh from 55 to 110 pounds.

“We also will be purchasing a forcible entry door system to train on techniques of forcible entry for different types of external and internal entry doors,” said Wysong.

In addition, a dual-element smoke generator will be obtained. This item produces artificial smoke, and can make the white “smoke” heavy enough so that if somebody is standing nearby, you can’t see them, the chief said.

Because it is artificial smoke, an instructor can be within the smoke-filled setting without needing to wear a smoke mask and, as a result, can talk and train in real time.

“We are very appreciative that the Legacy Committee selected our department as a recipient for the Legacy Funds,” Wysong said.

The Clinton-Warren Joint Fire District is one of nine recipients in the first cycle of grants awarded by the Legacy Fund Committee. The Legacy Fund consists of money the county obtained from selling county-owned Clinton Memorial Hospital.

Clinton County Legacy Fund Committee members join Clinton-Warren Joint Fire District staff to celebrate the awarding of a $45,000 Legacy Fund grant to the fire district based in Clarksville. From left are Michelle Morrison, Joe Reiley, Mike McCarty, Chief Bob Wysong, Andrew Wysong, Janet Dixon, Joe Hete, and Tony Long.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2020/09/web1_clin_war.jpgClinton County Legacy Fund Committee members join Clinton-Warren Joint Fire District staff to celebrate the awarding of a $45,000 Legacy Fund grant to the fire district based in Clarksville. From left are Michelle Morrison, Joe Reiley, Mike McCarty, Chief Bob Wysong, Andrew Wysong, Janet Dixon, Joe Hete, and Tony Long. Gary Huffenberger | News Journal

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