Honoring our agricultural roots: City accepts sculpture donated by Henry family


Henry family donates Dell sculpture for Point Park

News Journal



Sculptor Isaac Dell speaks at the dedication.


Wilmington Mayor John Stanforth, who grew up with members of the Henry family, speaks on Sunday.


Members of the Henry family and guests during the ceremonial ribbon-cutting in conjunction with the Wilmington-Clinton County Chamber of Commerce.


The cornstalks, representing the five generations of Henry family farmers as well as Clinton County’s ag heritage, stand tall at the dedication Sunday attended by many members of the Henry family and local officials and guests.


WILMINGTON — The celebration and ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Henry Sculpture at Point Park was held Sunday afternoon, June 13.

The public art, designed by local sculptor Isaac Dell, is a tribute to our community’s agricultural roots, as well as honoring the memory of Phoebe and Robert Henry.

The artwork was commissioned by Dorothy and Bruce Henry, who donated it to the City of Wilmington.

Bruce is one of three Henry sons raised on the family farm east of Wilmington. There have been five generations of Henrys who made the farm their home and business.

Mayor John Stanforth and Parks & Recreation Director Jermaine Isaac accepted the original bronze sculpture that Dell has been working on through the fall and winter.

Friends, family and citizens gathered to see the work with five bronze cornstalks, standing tall side by side and a relief depicting a farming couple finishing up a long day with animals congregated around them.

At night the sculpture will be lighted, and the five cornstalks, at 12 feet tall, will be a striking vision for Point Park at the confluence of Main Street and Rombach Avenue. Motorists and pedestrians will have ample opportunity to enjoy its beauty.

The Wilmington Garden Club tends the gardens at Point Park.

Last year, the gazebo that had been the centerpiece of the park was removed due to a crumbling foundation. The club members were considering what would replace it.

Bruce and Dorothy Henry had been mulling over how to honor the contributions of his parents and all other farming families in Clinton County. Both Dorothy and Bruce wanted to elevate the legacy of our agricultural heritage.

“This idea and a couple of others were on a short list of community projects generated by the Clinton County Foundation for the Henrys to consider,” said Jan Blohm, executive director, Clinton County Foundation. “We take a special pride in matching donors to good and charitable organizations with inspirational projects.

“This is one of the unique ways that the Foundation connects donors and nonprofits.”

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Sculptor Isaac Dell speaks at the dedication.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2021/06/web1_DSC_0901.jpgSculptor Isaac Dell speaks at the dedication.

Wilmington Mayor John Stanforth, who grew up with members of the Henry family, speaks on Sunday.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2021/06/web1_DSC_0904.jpgWilmington Mayor John Stanforth, who grew up with members of the Henry family, speaks on Sunday.

https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2021/06/web1_DSC_0909.jpg

Members of the Henry family and guests during the ceremonial ribbon-cutting in conjunction with the Wilmington-Clinton County Chamber of Commerce.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2021/06/web1_DSC_0911.jpgMembers of the Henry family and guests during the ceremonial ribbon-cutting in conjunction with the Wilmington-Clinton County Chamber of Commerce.

https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2021/06/web1_DSC_0828.jpg

https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2021/06/web1_DSC_0885.jpg

The cornstalks, representing the five generations of Henry family farmers as well as Clinton County’s ag heritage, stand tall at the dedication Sunday attended by many members of the Henry family and local officials and guests.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2021/06/web1_DSC_0891.jpgThe cornstalks, representing the five generations of Henry family farmers as well as Clinton County’s ag heritage, stand tall at the dedication Sunday attended by many members of the Henry family and local officials and guests.
Henry family donates Dell sculpture for Point Park

News Journal