Reminder: Early detection of colon cancer saves lives


Locals learn at CMH colon cancer event

By Gary Huffenberger - [email protected]



At a colon cancer education event Saturday morning in the Foster J. Boyd, MD Regional Cancer Center in Wilmington, a giant inflatable walk-through colon provides an up-close view of the colon, and what polyps and tumors look like. In the photo’s right foreground, a prospective future physician seems intent on crushing a malignant polyp. The inflatable colon was on loan from The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute.

At a colon cancer education event Saturday morning in the Foster J. Boyd, MD Regional Cancer Center in Wilmington, a giant inflatable walk-through colon provides an up-close view of the colon, and what polyps and tumors look like. In the photo’s right foreground, a prospective future physician seems intent on crushing a malignant polyp. The inflatable colon was on loan from The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute.


Gary Huffenberger | News Journal

Melissa Dadaian, program coordinator at Ohio State’s Center for Cancer Health Equity, gives a guided tour of an inflatable walk-through colon on loan from The James for the CMH-hosted educational event in Wilmington.


Gary Huffenberger | News Journal

A Brutus Buckeye figure, wearing a white medical jacket, made an appearance at the colon cancer education event in the Foster J. Boyd, MD Regional Cancer Center — A Member of The James Cancer Network. The event was hosted by Clinton Memorial Hospital, and three CMH staffers mingle with Brutus.


Gary Huffenberger | News Journal

Jeanne Gifford, CMH pharmacy technician, displays a tote bag bearing a message to have your colon checked.


Gary Huffenberger | News Journal

WILMINGTON — Last year 10 people died in Clinton County from colorectal cancer (for short, called colon cancer), making it the second most fatal cancer here in 2021 after lung-and-bronchus cancer at 28 deaths.

In fact, colon cancer has been the second most fatal type of cancer in Clinton County in four of the past five years, according to Vital Statistics collected by the Clinton County Health District.

On Saturday morning, Clinton Memorial Hospital (CMH) hosted a colon cancer education event at the nearby Foster J. Boyd, MD Regional Cancer Center.

During the pandemic, we’ve become familiar with the notion of “updated guidance” when it comes to medical recommendations after new data are assessed or circumstances change. The American Cancer Society now recommends that average-risk adults with no symptoms should begin colorectal screening at age 45, rather than at 50.

If you have a higher than average risk for colon cancer, you may need to start sooner and get tested more frequently. You should talk with your doctor about your risks and when a screening might be right for you.

According to an American Cancer Society info-graphics sheet available at the CMH event, risk factors for colon cancer include older age; personal or family history of colon cancer or polyps; inflammatory bowel disease; hereditary syndromes such as Lynch Syndrome; and Type 2 diabetes.

Anyone can get colon cancer, but some people are at an increased risk. In terms of gender, comparatively speaking men are at an increased risk, and in terms of race/ethnicity, comparatively speaking non-Hispanic Blacks are at an increased risk.

That said, colon cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the United States.

The Clinton Memorial Hospital winter/spring 2022 newsletter states: “A colonoscopy is a simple and effective procedure which serves two very important purposes: it helps to find colorectal cancer quickly and early so that it can be treated much more easily, and it helps to prevent colorectal cancer by identifying and removing any colorectal polyps before they become cancerous.”

According to the American Cancer Society info-graphics sheet, if colon cancer is found early, the five-year survival rate is 91 percent.

“Many more lives could be saved by understanding colorectal cancer risks, increasing screening rates, and making lifestyle changes,” states the American Cancer Society.

To learn more about detecting it early, visit cancer.org/colontesting , and to learn more in general visit cancer.org/colon .

Call 937-382-9606 to schedule your colonoscopy at CMH Regional Health System.

Reach Gary Huffenberger at 937-556-5768.

At a colon cancer education event Saturday morning in the Foster J. Boyd, MD Regional Cancer Center in Wilmington, a giant inflatable walk-through colon provides an up-close view of the colon, and what polyps and tumors look like. In the photo’s right foreground, a prospective future physician seems intent on crushing a malignant polyp. The inflatable colon was on loan from The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2022/03/web1_kids_c.jpgAt a colon cancer education event Saturday morning in the Foster J. Boyd, MD Regional Cancer Center in Wilmington, a giant inflatable walk-through colon provides an up-close view of the colon, and what polyps and tumors look like. In the photo’s right foreground, a prospective future physician seems intent on crushing a malignant polyp. The inflatable colon was on loan from The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute. Gary Huffenberger | News Journal

Melissa Dadaian, program coordinator at Ohio State’s Center for Cancer Health Equity, gives a guided tour of an inflatable walk-through colon on loan from The James for the CMH-hosted educational event in Wilmington.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2022/03/web1_advanced_c.jpgMelissa Dadaian, program coordinator at Ohio State’s Center for Cancer Health Equity, gives a guided tour of an inflatable walk-through colon on loan from The James for the CMH-hosted educational event in Wilmington. Gary Huffenberger | News Journal

A Brutus Buckeye figure, wearing a white medical jacket, made an appearance at the colon cancer education event in the Foster J. Boyd, MD Regional Cancer Center — A Member of The James Cancer Network. The event was hosted by Clinton Memorial Hospital, and three CMH staffers mingle with Brutus.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2022/03/web1_brutus_c.jpgA Brutus Buckeye figure, wearing a white medical jacket, made an appearance at the colon cancer education event in the Foster J. Boyd, MD Regional Cancer Center — A Member of The James Cancer Network. The event was hosted by Clinton Memorial Hospital, and three CMH staffers mingle with Brutus. Gary Huffenberger | News Journal

Jeanne Gifford, CMH pharmacy technician, displays a tote bag bearing a message to have your colon checked.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2022/03/web1_bag_c.jpgJeanne Gifford, CMH pharmacy technician, displays a tote bag bearing a message to have your colon checked. Gary Huffenberger | News Journal

https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2022/03/web1_overall_c.jpgGary Huffenberger | News Journal

https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2022/03/web1_polyp_c.jpgGary Huffenberger | News Journal

https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2022/03/web1_crohns_c.jpgGary Huffenberger | News Journal

https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2022/03/web1_cancer_c.jpgGary Huffenberger | News Journal
Locals learn at CMH colon cancer event

By Gary Huffenberger

[email protected]