Key dates upcoming for general election


Local issues on ballot; early voting starts Wednesday

News Journal staff



The next general election is just weeks away. Here are some key dates from the Clinton County Board of Elections:

• Tuesday, Oct. 11 — Voter registration deadline for Nov. 8 general election. Board of Elections open until 9 p.m. to receive registrations.

• Wednesday, Oct. 12 — Early in-person voting begins at the Board of Elections, 111 South Nelson Ave. (County Annex Building) in Wilmington.

• Saturday, Nov. 5 — Applications for absentee ballots must be received by boards of election by noon (3 days prior to general election)

• Tuesday, Nov. 8 — General Election Day: Polls are open 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Absentee ballots, returned in-person or via a method other than U.S. Mail, must be received by the boards of elections by close of polls.

Local ballots will also include contested statewide and regional races and two proposed constitutional amendments, as well as uncontested races for Clinton County auditor, treasurer, and one county commissioner post — all three incumbents.

LOCAL ISSUES

These are issues voters within Clinton County will see on their local ballots.

WCS tax renewal

Voters in the Wilmington City Schools district are asked to renew the 1 percent school district income tax on individuals and estates for five years, beginning Jan. 1, 2023. The current tax will expire at the end of this year. The income tax generates 15 percent of the district’s operating revenue each year.

If approved, 95 percent of the levy proceeds will be used for current expenses, and the remaining 5 percent will be earmarked for general ongoing permanent improvements.

In May, this issue failed for the second time, 1,710 votes to 1,423 votes (55%-45%). Voter turnout in the school district was just over 24 percent.

In November 2021, it failed 1,900 votes to 1,732 votes (52%-48%). Voter turnout in the school district was just shy of 28 percent.

BLS earnings tax

Voters in the Blanchester Local School District are asked to approve a tax of 1.25% of the earned income of “individuals residing in the school district for six years, beginning January 1, 2023, for the purpose of current expenses and permanent improvements.”

The district previously attempted to pass the tax issue in May, but it failed 598 votes to 563 (52%-48%).

Prior to the May vote, Blanchester Superintendent Randy Dunlap told the News Journal he not only hopes to take the district out of a budget deficit they’re in, but to fill vacant positions, get involved with a transportation management program, make concrete repairs, get new outside lights, update their security system, get new equipment for snow removal, plus return some after-school programs, and more.

Blan tax referendum

Blanchester Village Council approved a 1% earnings tax in June, with funds going toward the Blanchester Police Department and the tax taking effect on Jan. 1, 2023.

However, in early July a referendum movement began and the required amount of signatures were soon gathered to have a referendum placed on the November ballot to allow voters to decide the fate of this earnings tax.

If Blanchester voters approve of the tax, the only residents who would have to pay the tax would be those working in the village or those working outside the village and not already paying an earnings tax.

The tax would not affect senior citizens, those on Social Security, people paying an income tax elsewhere, or those on unemployment benefits. Those citizens would be exempt.

The issue on the ballot reads: “Shall Ordinance No. 2022.017 proposing a one percent (1%) levy on income tax for the purpose of maintaining police department services of the Village of Blanchester be approved?”

Other local issues are:

• Clark Township (including the Village of Martinsville) — Proposed 0.75-mill tax levy renewal for the purpose of providing ambulance service or emergency medical services (EMS), for five years.

• Clark Township (including the Village of Martinsville) — Proposed 0.7-mill tax levy renewal for the purpose of providing and maintaining fire protection, for five years.

• Clark Township (including the Village of Martinsville) — Proposed 1-mill tax levy renewal for the purpose of fire protection, for five years.

• Richland Township (including the Village of Sabina) — Proposed 1-mill tax levy renewal for the purpose of maintaining and operating cemeteries, for five years.

• Washington Township — Proposed 0.85-mill tax levy renewal for the purpose of providing and maintaining fire protection, for five years.

• Village of Harveysburg — Proposed ordinance on electric aggregation. The approved ballot language asks: “Shall the Village of Harveysburg have the authority to aggregate the retail electric loads located in the incorporated areas of the Village of Harveysburg, and for that purpose, enter into service agreements to facilitate for those loads the sale and purchase of electricity, such aggregation to occur automatically except where any person elects to opt out?”

• Village of Harveysburg — Proposed tax levy (renewal and increase) for the purpose of providing and maintaining motor vehicles, communications, and other equipment used directly in the operations of the police department and payment of salaries and benefits of permanent police personnel. This consists of a renewal of 2 mills and an increase of 0.5 mill (total of 2.5 mills), for five years.

• Village of Harveysburg — Proposed tax levy (renewal and increase) for the purpose of current operating expenses. This consists of a renewal of 2.5 mills and an increase of 0.5 mill (total of 3 mills), for five years.

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Local issues on ballot; early voting starts Wednesday

News Journal staff