Today in History


The Associated Press



Today is Friday, Jan. 13, the 13th day of 2023. There are 352 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Jan. 13, 2021, President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House over the violent Jan. 6 siege of the Capitol, becoming the only president to be twice impeached; ten Republicans joined Democrats in voting to impeach Trump on a charge of “incitement of insurrection.” (Trump would again be acquitted by the Senate in a vote after his term was over.)

On this date:

In 1733, James Oglethorpe and some 120 English colonists arrived at Charleston, South Carolina, while en route to settle in present-day Georgia.

In 1794, President George Washington approved a measure adding two stars and two stripes to the American flag, following the admission of Vermont and Kentucky to the Union. (The number of stripes was later reduced to the original 13.)

In 1898, Emile Zola’s famous defense of Capt. Alfred Dreyfus, “J’accuse,” (zhah-KOOZ’), was published in Paris.

In 1941, a new law went into effect granting Puerto Ricans U.S. birthright citizenship. Novelist and poet James Joyce died in Zurich, Switzerland, less than a month before his 59th birthday.

In 1964, Roman Catholic Bishop Karol Wojtyla (voy-TEE’-wah) (the future Pope John Paul II) was appointed Archbishop of Krakow, Poland, by Pope Paul VI.

In 1982, an Air Florida 737 crashed into Washington, D.C.’s 14th Street Bridge and fell into the Potomac River while trying to take off during a snowstorm, killing a total of 78 people, including four motorists on the bridge; four passengers and a flight attendant survived.

In 1987, West German police arrested Mohammed Ali Hamadi, a suspect in the 1985 hijacking of a TWA jetliner and the killing of a U.S. Navy diver who was on board. (Although convicted and sentenced to life, Hamadi was paroled by Germany in December 2005 and returned home to Lebanon.)

In 1990, L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia became the nation’s first elected Black governor as he took the oath of office in Richmond.

In 1992, Japan apologized for forcing tens of thousands of Korean women to serve as sex slaves for its soldiers during World War II, citing newly uncovered documents that showed the Japanese army had had a role in abducting the so-called “comfort women.”

In 2000, Microsoft chairman Bill Gates stepped aside as chief executive and promoted company president Steve Ballmer to the position.

In 2001, an earthquake estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey at magnitude 7.7 struck El Salvador; more than 840 people were killed.

In 2011, a funeral was held in Tucson, Arizona, for 9-year-old Christina Taylor Green, the youngest victim of a mass shooting that also claimed five other lives and critically wounded Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.

In 2020, at a royal family summit in eastern England, Queen Elizabeth II brokered a deal to secure the future of the monarchy; it would allow Prince Harry and his wife, Meghan, to live part-time in Canada.

Ten years ago: A Cairo appeals court overturned Hosni Mubarak’s life sentence and ordered a retrial of the former Egyptian president for failing to prevent the killing of hundreds of protesters during the 2011 uprising that toppled his regime. (Mubarak was later ordered released.) “Argo” won best motion picture drama at the Golden Globes; “Les Miserables” won best picture musical or comedy.

Five years ago: A false alarm that warned of a ballistic missile headed for Hawaii sent the islands into a panic, with people abandoning cars on a highway and preparing to flee their homes; officials apologized and said the alert was sent when someone hit the wrong button during a shift change. Two Army captains who met at West Point, Daniel Hall and Vincent Franchino, returned there to be married, in what The New York Times said was believed to be the first same-sex marriage of active-duty personnel at the military academy.

One year ago: The Supreme Court found that the Biden administration had overstepped its authority by requiring that employees at large businesses get a COVID-19 vaccine or test regularly and wear a mask on the job; the court allowed the administration to proceed with a vaccine mandate for most health care workers. Two U.S. science agencies, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, said 2021 was the sixth hottest year on record globally, part of a long-term warming trend.

Today’s birthdays: Actor Frances Sternhagen is 93. TV personality Nick Clooney is 89. Comedian Charlie Brill is 85. Actor Billy Gray is 85. Actor Richard Moll is 80. Rock musician Trevor Rabin is 69. Rock musician James Lomenzo (Megadeth) is 64. Actor Kevin Anderson is 63. Actor Julia Louis-Dreyfus is 62. Rock singer Graham “Suggs” McPherson (Madness) is 62. Country singer Trace Adkins is 61. Actor Penelope Ann Miller is 59. Actor Patrick Dempsey is 57. Actor Suzanne Cryer is 56. Actor Traci Bingham is 55. Actor Keith Coogan is 53. TV producer-writer Shonda Rhimes is 53. Actor Nicole Eggert is 51. Actor Ross McCall is 47. Actor Michael Pena is 47. Actor Orlando Bloom is 46. Meteorologist Ginger Zee (TV: “Good Morning America”) is 42. Actor Ruth Wilson is 41. Actor Julian Morris is 40. Actor Beau Mirchoff is 34. Actor Liam Hemsworth is 33. NHL center Connor McDavid is 26.

The Associated Press