Throwback Thursday: Here Come the Brides


In 1918, Genia Walker Williams contacted the Spanish influenza on a Wednesday and died three days later. She was 39. Her mother, Katy McClain Walker, using Genia’s wedding picture as a model, fashioned a look-alike doll for Genia’s daughters, Kathryn Ellen and Winnifred. In 1989, Winnifred Williams Carroll donated the doll to the Clinton County History Center. Pictured are the doll as well as the wedding picture of Genia Walker Williams, married in 1897. The Clinton County History Center is currently featuring the Here Come the Brides wedding exhibit, with 40 dresses reflecting 160 years of local wedding attire. Admission is free for members; $5 for non-members. Photo courtesy of Clinton County History Center, www.clintoncountyhistory.org.

In 1918, Genia Walker Williams contacted the Spanish influenza on a Wednesday and died three days later. She was 39. Her mother, Katy McClain Walker, using Genia’s wedding picture as a model, fashioned a look-alike doll for Genia’s daughters, Kathryn Ellen and Winnifred. In 1989, Winnifred Williams Carroll donated the doll to the Clinton County History Center. Pictured are the doll as well as the wedding picture of Genia Walker Williams, married in 1897. The Clinton County History Center is currently featuring the Here Come the Brides wedding exhibit, with 40 dresses reflecting 160 years of local wedding attire. Admission is free for members; $5 for non-members. Photo courtesy of Clinton County History Center, www.clintoncountyhistory.org.


Courtesy photos

In 1918, Genia Walker Williams contacted the Spanish influenza on a Wednesday and died three days later. She was 39. Her mother, Katy McClain Walker, using Genia’s wedding picture as a model, fashioned a look-alike doll for Genia’s daughters, Kathryn Ellen and Winnifred. In 1989, Winnifred Williams Carroll donated the doll to the Clinton County History Center. Pictured are the doll as well as the wedding picture of Genia Walker Williams, married in 1897. The Clinton County History Center is currently featuring the Here Come the Brides wedding exhibit, with 40 dresses reflecting 160 years of local wedding attire. Admission is free for members; $5 for non-members. Photo courtesy of Clinton County History Center, www.clintoncountyhistory.org.


Courtesy photos

In 1918, Genia Walker Williams contacted the Spanish influenza on a Wednesday and died three days later. She was 39. Her mother, Katy McClain Walker, using Genia’s wedding picture as a model, fashioned a look-alike doll for Genia’s daughters, Kathryn Ellen and Winnifred. In 1989, Winnifred Williams Carroll donated the doll to the Clinton County History Center. Pictured are the doll as well as the wedding picture of Genia Walker Williams, married in 1897. The Clinton County History Center is currently featuring the Here Come the Brides wedding exhibit, with 40 dresses reflecting 160 years of local wedding attire. Admission is free for members; $5 for non-members. Photo courtesy of Clinton County History Center, www.clintoncountyhistory.org.

In 1918, Genia Walker Williams contacted the Spanish influenza on a Wednesday and died three days later. She was 39. Her mother, Katy McClain Walker, using Genia’s wedding picture as a model, fashioned a look-alike doll for Genia’s daughters, Kathryn Ellen and Winnifred. In 1989, Winnifred Williams Carroll donated the doll to the Clinton County History Center. Pictured are the doll as well as the wedding picture of Genia Walker Williams, married in 1897. The Clinton County History Center is currently featuring the Here Come the Brides wedding exhibit, with 40 dresses reflecting 160 years of local wedding attire. Admission is free for members; $5 for non-members. Photo courtesy of Clinton County History Center, www.clintoncountyhistory.org.

In 1918, Genia Walker Williams contacted the Spanish influenza on a Wednesday and died three days later. She was 39. Her mother, Katy McClain Walker, using Genia’s wedding picture as a model, fashioned a look-alike doll for Genia’s daughters, Kathryn Ellen and Winnifred. In 1989, Winnifred Williams Carroll donated the doll to the Clinton County History Center. Pictured are the doll as well as the wedding picture of Genia Walker Williams, married in 1897. The Clinton County History Center is currently featuring the Here Come the Brides wedding exhibit, with 40 dresses reflecting 160 years of local wedding attire. Admission is free for members; $5 for non-members. Photo courtesy of Clinton County History Center, www.clintoncountyhistory.org.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/04/web1_Genia.jpgIn 1918, Genia Walker Williams contacted the Spanish influenza on a Wednesday and died three days later. She was 39. Her mother, Katy McClain Walker, using Genia’s wedding picture as a model, fashioned a look-alike doll for Genia’s daughters, Kathryn Ellen and Winnifred. In 1989, Winnifred Williams Carroll donated the doll to the Clinton County History Center. Pictured are the doll as well as the wedding picture of Genia Walker Williams, married in 1897. The Clinton County History Center is currently featuring the Here Come the Brides wedding exhibit, with 40 dresses reflecting 160 years of local wedding attire. Admission is free for members; $5 for non-members. Photo courtesy of Clinton County History Center, www.clintoncountyhistory.org. Courtesy photos

In 1918, Genia Walker Williams contacted the Spanish influenza on a Wednesday and died three days later. She was 39. Her mother, Katy McClain Walker, using Genia’s wedding picture as a model, fashioned a look-alike doll for Genia’s daughters, Kathryn Ellen and Winnifred. In 1989, Winnifred Williams Carroll donated the doll to the Clinton County History Center. Pictured are the doll as well as the wedding picture of Genia Walker Williams, married in 1897. The Clinton County History Center is currently featuring the Here Come the Brides wedding exhibit, with 40 dresses reflecting 160 years of local wedding attire. Admission is free for members; $5 for non-members. Photo courtesy of Clinton County History Center, www.clintoncountyhistory.org.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/04/web1_GeniaWedding.jpgIn 1918, Genia Walker Williams contacted the Spanish influenza on a Wednesday and died three days later. She was 39. Her mother, Katy McClain Walker, using Genia’s wedding picture as a model, fashioned a look-alike doll for Genia’s daughters, Kathryn Ellen and Winnifred. In 1989, Winnifred Williams Carroll donated the doll to the Clinton County History Center. Pictured are the doll as well as the wedding picture of Genia Walker Williams, married in 1897. The Clinton County History Center is currently featuring the Here Come the Brides wedding exhibit, with 40 dresses reflecting 160 years of local wedding attire. Admission is free for members; $5 for non-members. Photo courtesy of Clinton County History Center, www.clintoncountyhistory.org. Courtesy photos