Leadership Clinton adults, youths explore county’s history


By Carly Moritz and - Savannah Henderson - Clinton-Massie LCYC Class of 2019



Both the adults and youths of Leadership Clinton’s Class of ‘19 stopped by the Clinton County Convention and Visitors Bureau.

Both the adults and youths of Leadership Clinton’s Class of ‘19 stopped by the Clinton County Convention and Visitors Bureau.


Courtesy photo

WILMINGTON — Members of the 2018-2019 Leadership Clinton and Leadership Clinton Youth Collaborative gathered in October to explore the history of Clinton County and Wilmington.

Class members completed a historic walking tour of downtown Wilmington, led by Leadership Clinton alumnus Kathleen Norman, learning about the history and architecture of the city. The group started at the Friends Meeting House downtown to learn about Wilmington’s Quaker history from retired Wilmington College professor Dr. Neil Snarr.

Class members then had the opportunity to tour the Clinton County Visitors Bureau. While there, members learned about many of the attractions that Clinton County has to offer throughout the year, including Jeep Jam and last summer’s “Rock the Band” night, held at the historic Murphy Theatre.

Amanda Harrison, executive director at United Way, then talked to class members about the history of United Way’s former location (100 W. Main St.) and explained the many services their program offers to residents of Clinton County.

Harrison shared that United Way raises funds for over 30 different programs through small workplace contributions and state grants.

She also discussed one of the services recently implemented in Clinton County called 2-1-1. This service allows residents to dial 2-1-1 on any phone for information that connects residents with local agencies and assistance programs throughout the county.

Dan and Marla Stewart, Murphy Theatre volunteers, then showed the group around the newly renovated theatre. The Murphy Theatre turned 100 years old this past summer and through various grants and private donations has been renovated and restored to its former glory.

The class then went to American Legion Post 49 to discuss veteran outreach in Clinton County with First Vice Commander/Clinton County Commander Richard James. James discussed past experiences with Honor Flight and the plans for future activities at the post.

The final stop for the day for the youth was the Clinton County History Center, where director Kay Fisher led the class members on a visual tour of artifacts from Clinton County. Students also learned about the evolution of Southwest Ohio and downtown Wilmington.

Both the adult and youth classes will resume in November with a focus on local government.

About Leadership Clinton

The Clinton County Leadership Institute was created in the fall of 1986.

Over 140 companies and individuals have sponsored more than 500 graduates in the adult program and more than 400 youth have graduated from the Youth collaborative program begun in 1994.

Both the adults and youths of Leadership Clinton’s Class of ‘19 stopped by the Clinton County Convention and Visitors Bureau.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2018/11/web1_lcyc.jpgBoth the adults and youths of Leadership Clinton’s Class of ‘19 stopped by the Clinton County Convention and Visitors Bureau. Courtesy photo

By Carly Moritz and

Savannah Henderson

Clinton-Massie LCYC Class of 2019