Throwback Thursday: Dolls for friends in Japan


In 1926 Dr. Sidney Gulick founded the Committee on World Friendship Among Children. Its first project was the Friendship Doll Exchange — sending American dolls to Japan to encourage and nourish the growth and understanding of friendship amongst children in Japan and the U.S. More than 12,000 dolls were sent, including 58 from Clinton County. The Wilmington Friends Meeting Junior Sunday School sponsored dolls that were 15 inches high, with brown eyes that opened and closed, and a mechanical voice box that said, “Mama.” The kids of Wilmington Friends Meeting chose to dress their dolls in a traditional gray Quaker dress, shawl and bonnet, and named her “Ellen C.” in honor of Ellen C. Wright, a member of the first graduating class of Wilmington College in 1875 who was a teacher and librarian at the college. A second doll was named “Callie B.” for Mrs. Fairley. <em>— Ruth Brindle</em>

In 1926 Dr. Sidney Gulick founded the Committee on World Friendship Among Children. Its first project was the Friendship Doll Exchange — sending American dolls to Japan to encourage and nourish the growth and understanding of friendship amongst children in Japan and the U.S. More than 12,000 dolls were sent, including 58 from Clinton County. The Wilmington Friends Meeting Junior Sunday School sponsored dolls that were 15 inches high, with brown eyes that opened and closed, and a mechanical voice box that said, “Mama.” The kids of Wilmington Friends Meeting chose to dress their dolls in a traditional gray Quaker dress, shawl and bonnet, and named her “Ellen C.” in honor of Ellen C. Wright, a member of the first graduating class of Wilmington College in 1875 who was a teacher and librarian at the college. A second doll was named “Callie B.” for Mrs. Fairley. — Ruth Brindle


Photo courtesy of Neil Snarr

In 1926 Dr. Sidney Gulick founded the Committee on World Friendship Among Children. Its first project was the Friendship Doll Exchange — sending American dolls to Japan to encourage and nourish the growth and understanding of friendship amongst children in Japan and the U.S. More than 12,000 dolls were sent, including 58 from Clinton County. The Wilmington Friends Meeting Junior Sunday School sponsored dolls that were 15 inches high, with brown eyes that opened and closed, and a mechanical voice box that said, “Mama.” The kids of Wilmington Friends Meeting chose to dress their dolls in a traditional gray Quaker dress, shawl and bonnet, and named her “Ellen C.” in honor of Ellen C. Wright, a member of the first graduating class of Wilmington College in 1875 who was a teacher and librarian at the college. A second doll was named “Callie B.” for Mrs. Fairley. — Ruth Brindle

In 1926 Dr. Sidney Gulick founded the Committee on World Friendship Among Children. Its first project was the Friendship Doll Exchange — sending American dolls to Japan to encourage and nourish the growth and understanding of friendship amongst children in Japan and the U.S. More than 12,000 dolls were sent, including 58 from Clinton County. The Wilmington Friends Meeting Junior Sunday School sponsored dolls that were 15 inches high, with brown eyes that opened and closed, and a mechanical voice box that said, “Mama.” The kids of Wilmington Friends Meeting chose to dress their dolls in a traditional gray Quaker dress, shawl and bonnet, and named her “Ellen C.” in honor of Ellen C. Wright, a member of the first graduating class of Wilmington College in 1875 who was a teacher and librarian at the college. A second doll was named “Callie B.” for Mrs. Fairley. — Ruth Brindle
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2018/12/web1_20181130165629_001.jpgIn 1926 Dr. Sidney Gulick founded the Committee on World Friendship Among Children. Its first project was the Friendship Doll Exchange — sending American dolls to Japan to encourage and nourish the growth and understanding of friendship amongst children in Japan and the U.S. More than 12,000 dolls were sent, including 58 from Clinton County. The Wilmington Friends Meeting Junior Sunday School sponsored dolls that were 15 inches high, with brown eyes that opened and closed, and a mechanical voice box that said, “Mama.” The kids of Wilmington Friends Meeting chose to dress their dolls in a traditional gray Quaker dress, shawl and bonnet, and named her “Ellen C.” in honor of Ellen C. Wright, a member of the first graduating class of Wilmington College in 1875 who was a teacher and librarian at the college. A second doll was named “Callie B.” for Mrs. Fairley. — Ruth Brindle Photo courtesy of Neil Snarr