C-M students know their vocabulary


By Gary Huffenberger - ghuffenberger@civitasmedia.com



Clinton-Massie student Sidney Avey, left, is recognized as a 2015 Clinton County Business Advisory Council speech contest runner-up at Monday’s school board meeting. She is joined by Clinton-Massie Local Schools Board of Education member Chris Harrison.

Clinton-Massie student Sidney Avey, left, is recognized as a 2015 Clinton County Business Advisory Council speech contest runner-up at Monday’s school board meeting. She is joined by Clinton-Massie Local Schools Board of Education member Chris Harrison.


At a Clinton-Massie school board meeting, three staffers with the Clinton-Massie branch of the Wilmington Public Library receive CMAD awards — Consistently Making A Difference. From left are Kat McKay, Carla Hurley, Clinton-Massie board member Chris Harrison and Anita Stanley.


Clinton-Massie educator Curt Bradshaw receives a CMAD (Consistently Making A Difference) award. In support of the recognition, students wrote that “Mr. B” makes learning fun, including the use of “wacky puzzles.” One student wrote he or she was happy they got to choose their projects.


On Monday night, Clinton-Massie High School guidance counselor Donna Potts receives a CMAD (Consistently Making A Difference) award. Previously an elementary counselor for Clinton-Massie, she also is a graduate of the district.


Clinton-Massie board member Mike McCarty receives a gift and recognition Monday for his service at his final meeting on the board. From left are board members Chris Harrison, Shane Carter, McCarty, Andy Avery and Jeremy Lamb. Board of Education President Lamb said McCarty brought an objective viewpoint to his role on the board and made data-based decisions, and brought no preconceived notions about what a board member does.


CLARKSVILLE — Clinton-Massie students do well with English language vocabulary tests, the school district’s curriculum director reported to the board of education.

Even so, an area that could use improvement among the district’s students is written expression, added Robyn Donisi, Clinton-Massie Local Schools curriculum director.

Those assessments stem from 2014-15 school year state test results, Donisi said.

An acquisition of vocabulary has been a focus of the district in the past, according to Donisi, and this year the elementary school has made “writing and writing convention” a target area.

Algebra would be an area on which district educators need to focus energy “as we look back at how our students have performed over time,” Donisi advised board members.

Some things to celebrate from last school year are the results in third-grade math, seventh-grade math and reading, and high school American history and American government.

“Our [high school] geometry really knocked it out of the park,” added the curriculum director.

Across Ohio, fifth grade has been a tough area in mathematics, Donisi said.

At one juncture, she said it is important for teachers to be sure they “understand what it looks like when they [Ohio Department of Education guidelines] say that model and reason in the mathematics” is a goal.

During her report, the curriculum director also asked the board to consider purchasing an instructional resource named Apex Learning. On its official website, Apex Learning identifies itself as “the leading provider of blended and virtual learning solutions to the nation’s schools.”

It could be used, she said, to help students prepare for the college admission tests ACT and SAT, as well as to prepare for the state test that’s needed for graduation and to assist high school students who are behind on their credit hours.

For 30 students, the cost of the system is $6,150, she said. There also is a $1,500 price tag that accompanies professional development in order to administer Apex Learning.

On another matter, Donisi spoke about issues related to the district’s chemistry course offerings, Chemistry 1 and Chemistry 2. According to the state, the two semester-long classes should be one course, rather than being split up into two courses each offering one credit hour.

Clinton-Massie Local Schools Board of Education President Jeremy Lamb recommended that corrective action be taken quickly. He suggested that district officials pick among the options that remain available with the school year almost half done. That might include make-up work.

About 75 students at Clinton-Massie High School are taking Chemistry 1 this semester.

Reach Gary Huffenberger at 937-556-5768 or on Twitter @GHuffenberger.

Clinton-Massie student Sidney Avey, left, is recognized as a 2015 Clinton County Business Advisory Council speech contest runner-up at Monday’s school board meeting. She is joined by Clinton-Massie Local Schools Board of Education member Chris Harrison.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2015/12/web1_avey_f.jpgClinton-Massie student Sidney Avey, left, is recognized as a 2015 Clinton County Business Advisory Council speech contest runner-up at Monday’s school board meeting. She is joined by Clinton-Massie Local Schools Board of Education member Chris Harrison.

At a Clinton-Massie school board meeting, three staffers with the Clinton-Massie branch of the Wilmington Public Library receive CMAD awards — Consistently Making A Difference. From left are Kat McKay, Carla Hurley, Clinton-Massie board member Chris Harrison and Anita Stanley.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2015/12/web1_library_ladies_f.jpgAt a Clinton-Massie school board meeting, three staffers with the Clinton-Massie branch of the Wilmington Public Library receive CMAD awards — Consistently Making A Difference. From left are Kat McKay, Carla Hurley, Clinton-Massie board member Chris Harrison and Anita Stanley.

Clinton-Massie educator Curt Bradshaw receives a CMAD (Consistently Making A Difference) award. In support of the recognition, students wrote that “Mr. B” makes learning fun, including the use of “wacky puzzles.” One student wrote he or she was happy they got to choose their projects.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2015/12/web1_curt_f.jpgClinton-Massie educator Curt Bradshaw receives a CMAD (Consistently Making A Difference) award. In support of the recognition, students wrote that “Mr. B” makes learning fun, including the use of “wacky puzzles.” One student wrote he or she was happy they got to choose their projects.

On Monday night, Clinton-Massie High School guidance counselor Donna Potts receives a CMAD (Consistently Making A Difference) award. Previously an elementary counselor for Clinton-Massie, she also is a graduate of the district.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2015/12/web1_donna_potts_f.jpgOn Monday night, Clinton-Massie High School guidance counselor Donna Potts receives a CMAD (Consistently Making A Difference) award. Previously an elementary counselor for Clinton-Massie, she also is a graduate of the district.

Clinton-Massie board member Mike McCarty receives a gift and recognition Monday for his service at his final meeting on the board. From left are board members Chris Harrison, Shane Carter, McCarty, Andy Avery and Jeremy Lamb. Board of Education President Lamb said McCarty brought an objective viewpoint to his role on the board and made data-based decisions, and brought no preconceived notions about what a board member does.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2015/12/web1_mccarty_recognized_f.jpgClinton-Massie board member Mike McCarty receives a gift and recognition Monday for his service at his final meeting on the board. From left are board members Chris Harrison, Shane Carter, McCarty, Andy Avery and Jeremy Lamb. Board of Education President Lamb said McCarty brought an objective viewpoint to his role on the board and made data-based decisions, and brought no preconceived notions about what a board member does.

By Gary Huffenberger

ghuffenberger@civitasmedia.com