Door of Hope to move to Walnut Street


Work crews were busy Thursday at a currently vacant South Walnut Street church building, readying the place for a move by the Wilmington Door of Hope fellowship who currently meet on East Main Street next to the railroad tracks. Presently at about 75 members, they have outgrown that space. Pastor Matt Weaver said the congregation includes a lot of young families. Most attendees have a Mennonite background, but there a quite a few who are not Mennonite and the church calls itself non-denominational, said Weaver. On Thursday, these men in the photo from Tersus Lux Drywall were working on stilts. At work in another area of the structure were Dave Hurst and Sparky Spinks with Wical’s Roofing & Remodeling. Weaver hopes the relocation will occur in a month or two.

Work crews were busy Thursday at a currently vacant South Walnut Street church building, readying the place for a move by the Wilmington Door of Hope fellowship who currently meet on East Main Street next to the railroad tracks. Presently at about 75 members, they have outgrown that space. Pastor Matt Weaver said the congregation includes a lot of young families. Most attendees have a Mennonite background, but there a quite a few who are not Mennonite and the church calls itself non-denominational, said Weaver. On Thursday, these men in the photo from Tersus Lux Drywall were working on stilts. At work in another area of the structure were Dave Hurst and Sparky Spinks with Wical’s Roofing & Remodeling. Weaver hopes the relocation will occur in a month or two.


Gary Huffenberger | News Journal

Work crews were busy Thursday at a currently vacant South Walnut Street church building, readying the place for a move by the Wilmington Door of Hope fellowship who currently meet on East Main Street next to the railroad tracks. Presently at about 75 members, they have outgrown that space. Pastor Matt Weaver said the congregation includes a lot of young families. Most attendees have a Mennonite background, but there a quite a few who are not Mennonite and the church calls itself non-denominational, said Weaver. On Thursday, these men in the photo from Tersus Lux Drywall were working on stilts. At work in another area of the structure were Dave Hurst and Sparky Spinks with Wical’s Roofing & Remodeling. Weaver hopes the relocation will occur in a month or two.

Work crews were busy Thursday at a currently vacant South Walnut Street church building, readying the place for a move by the Wilmington Door of Hope fellowship who currently meet on East Main Street next to the railroad tracks. Presently at about 75 members, they have outgrown that space. Pastor Matt Weaver said the congregation includes a lot of young families. Most attendees have a Mennonite background, but there a quite a few who are not Mennonite and the church calls itself non-denominational, said Weaver. On Thursday, these men in the photo from Tersus Lux Drywall were working on stilts. At work in another area of the structure were Dave Hurst and Sparky Spinks with Wical’s Roofing & Remodeling. Weaver hopes the relocation will occur in a month or two.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2018/07/web1_stilts.jpgWork crews were busy Thursday at a currently vacant South Walnut Street church building, readying the place for a move by the Wilmington Door of Hope fellowship who currently meet on East Main Street next to the railroad tracks. Presently at about 75 members, they have outgrown that space. Pastor Matt Weaver said the congregation includes a lot of young families. Most attendees have a Mennonite background, but there a quite a few who are not Mennonite and the church calls itself non-denominational, said Weaver. On Thursday, these men in the photo from Tersus Lux Drywall were working on stilts. At work in another area of the structure were Dave Hurst and Sparky Spinks with Wical’s Roofing & Remodeling. Weaver hopes the relocation will occur in a month or two. Gary Huffenberger | News Journal