‘Stars’ to shine for dance show


Clinton County Dancing with the Stars to perform Oct. 24

By Dylanne Petros - dpetros@civitasmedia.com



Rhonda Wheasler, director of the show, highlights the different decades the dances will be from during Tuesday’s cast reveal party while Timothy Larrick waits to announce the “celebrities” for the show. All dances with be from different decades and there will be 10 dances overall.


Dylanne Petros | Wilmington News Journal

WILMINGTON – A new batch of “stars” are ready to get their groove on.

The 2015 Clinton County Dancing with the Stars cast was announced Tuesday night at the Murphy Theatre.

This year will be a little bit different, and even more fun, than last year, said Rhonda Wheasler, director of the event.

“We have higher expectations not only for our community involvement but also the show itself,” she said.

Last year’s show raised $21,000 to add heating and cooling into the upstairs rental space of the Murphy Theatre, Wheasler said. This year’s goal will be to raise enough money to help with the replacement of the mortar between the bricks in the back of the building, a process called tuckpointing. The tuckpointing, Wheasler said, will help make the building water tight.

To make the event even more fun, she said, there is going to be a theme to the show.

“We’re doing Dances Through the Decades, starting in 1910 and working up to today,” she said.

The goal of doing decades is to have the dance and the costumes be from that specific decade.

Before the cast was revealed, they had no idea who they would be dancing with and what dance they would perform.

In the 1910s, Wheasler said it was the first time dancers were facing each other and dances like the waltz were considered scandalous. The foxtrot was invented by Henry Fox, born Arthur Carringford in 1914, and the tango was also created.

Greg Nielson, CEO of Clinton Memorial Hospital, and Erin Moore will be dancing the foxtrot, which will be choreographed by Dessie Rogers.

In the 1920s there was major change in the rights of women, as the 19th amendment was passed, giving women the right to vote, Wheasler said.

The end of World War I, “The Great Gatsby” and “The Jazz Singer,” the first talkie, inspired people to express themselves through dance, she said. At the same time, dance marathons became popular, and the longest lasted 22 weeks and three days. The 1920s, Wheasler said, “was a party before the market crashed.”

Leva Bath, instructor at Get Fit, and Timothy Larrick will be dancing the Charleston, which will be choreographed by Rogers.

In the 1930s the Great Depression was in full swing.

“Everything involved escaping the Great Depression,” Wheasler said. “In dance, it was the time of Al Capone and the end of prohibition.”

The rhumba became popular during the 1930s, originating from Cuba.

Bobbi Jo Schlaegel, owner of Long’s Pharmacy, and Justin Arehart will be dancing the rhumba, which will be choreographed by Rogers.

In the 1940s Marvel introduced Captain America into its universe and became a hit. Jazz and swing were introduced, while NASCAR had its first race, Wheasler said.

Jill Thompson, owner of Country View Pet Hospital, and Cole Haugh will be dancing the swing, which will be choreographed by Haugh.

In the 1950s adults were settling down and raising families, Wheasler said. Because people were settling down, dancing was frowned upon.

With Elvis Presley’s first song “That’s Alright” being released in 1953, dancing soon became seen as frivolous due to Presley’s gyrating hips.

“The teenagers felt caged and wanted to break free,” Wheasler said. “The swing dances of their parents became more sexual.”

Duane Weyand, Wilmington Police Chief, and Rogers will be dancing the jive, which will be choreographed by Haugh.

In the 1960s there was a huge change in society. The Beatles become popular, first appearing in U.S. on the “The Ed Sullivan Show” Feb. 9, 1964. The books “To Kill a Mockingbird” and “Feminine Mystique” were released in 1960 and 1963 respectively. Peace movements also started popping up all over the country, with the beginning of the Vietnam War.

“Woodstock was the epitome of peace movements,” Wheasler said.

Rick Hosler, principal of Blanchester High School, and Erin Moore will be dancing the twist, which will be choreographed by Rogers.

In the 1970s there were many political events such as the Kent State shootings, Watergate and President Nixon’s resignation that led to people rebelling, Wheasler said.

The Vietnam War ended in the 1970s though, and with the end of the war came a new sound.

“Soft rock, punk, reggae all ruled the airwaves,” she said.

Sarah Hawley, production manager of Orange Frazier Press, and Haugh will be dancing the disco, which will be choreographed by Haugh.

In the 1980s, technology started changing. Apple released the first Macintosh computer.

“Advancements in technology affected music,” Wheasler said.

Music Television, now known as MTV, was created due to the advancements in technology. Music videos took over.

Michael Jackson dominated the airwaves and helped create the moonwalk, while rap, hip-hop and street dancing became popular, Wheasler said.

Jesse Littleton, a musician, and Rogers will be dancing the lambada, which will be choreographed by Rogers.

In the 1990s there was a lot of uncertainty with all the technological changes that were occurring, Wheasler said.

“People were looking for structure,” she said.

Because people were looking for some kind of structure, line dancing, which originated and became popular in the 1950’s under the name the Madison, became popular again.

Tim Wiederhold, admissions counselor at Wilmington College, and Larrick will be dancing the country line dance, which will be choreographed by Haugh.

In the 2000s, there was a lot of devastation with Hurricane Katrina and the tsunami in the Indian Ocean, and there were historic events like Barack Obama being elected president, Wheasler said.

Again, Apple was changing the way people view technology and music, she said.

“Apple came out with their first iPod, which would change everything from how we listen to music and read and how we play,” Wheasler said.

Music also also become more diverse with the creation of YouTube, which allows new videos to be posted all the time and new forms of dance being created, she said.

“Music is more diverse now than it ever has been,” Wheasler said.

Sonya Crawford, event coordinator at the General Denver Hotel, and Rogers will be dancing the style of hip-hop, which will be choreographed by Haugh.

In addition to the decade dances, Willard Lane, who performed at the Murphy Theatre in 1953, will dance the soft shoe with Larrick. Students from the Wilmington Performing Arts Studio will also perform.

Clinton County’s Dancing with the Stars will be Oct. 24 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets, which are $12, can be purchased online at themurphytheatre.org or by calling 382-3643.

“This should be interesting,” Wheasler said.

Rhonda Wheasler, director of the show, highlights the different decades the dances will be from during Tuesday’s cast reveal party while Timothy Larrick waits to announce the “celebrities” for the show. All dances with be from different decades and there will be 10 dances overall.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2015/08/web1_castreveal1.jpgRhonda Wheasler, director of the show, highlights the different decades the dances will be from during Tuesday’s cast reveal party while Timothy Larrick waits to announce the “celebrities” for the show. All dances with be from different decades and there will be 10 dances overall. Dylanne Petros | Wilmington News Journal
Clinton County Dancing with the Stars to perform Oct. 24

By Dylanne Petros

dpetros@civitasmedia.com