You say tomato, they say tomadah


Three Wilmington College Students were recognized and rewarded for helping to grow tomatoes at the academic farm that were bigger than submitted for the Heaviest Tomato contest. Winners of the contest were Tom Dalton came in first place with his 2.535-pound German strawberry, Clayton Cole in second place with his 2.53-pound German strawberry, and Guy Ashmore in third with a 2.105-pound mountain gold.


John Hamilton | News Journal

People had plenty to try out at the Eighth Annual Tomadah Paradah on Saturday at Wilmington College’s farm. With over 100 colorfully named tomatoes there was no shortage of variety, in addition to a large variety of peppers. The event was co-sponsored by the college’s Agricultural Department and Swindler & Sons Florist and Garden Center.


John Hamilton | News Journal

From left, Hugh O’Neill, John and Pam Myers look at the variety of peppers growing at the Wilmington College’s academic farm during the Tomadah Paradah on Satuday.


John Hamilton | News Journal

Dr. Rex Bueller, right, and Martha Jo Terrell Buller try one of 114 different tomatoes during the Tomadah Paradah on Saturday.


John Hamilton | News Journal

Ed Zoldak and Kim Stroop with some of the tomatoes growing at the Tomadah Paradah on Saturday. Stroop sported a fitting shirt that reads, “I love gardening. From my head tomatoes.”


John Hamilton | News Journal

Three Wilmington College Students were recognized and rewarded for helping to grow tomatoes at the academic farm that were bigger than submitted for the Heaviest Tomato contest. Winners of the contest were Tom Dalton came in first place with his 2.535-pound German strawberry, Clayton Cole in second place with his 2.53-pound German strawberry, and Guy Ashmore in third with a 2.105-pound mountain gold.

People had plenty to try out at the Eighth Annual Tomadah Paradah on Saturday at Wilmington College’s farm. With over 100 colorfully named tomatoes there was no shortage of variety, in addition to a large variety of peppers. The event was co-sponsored by the college’s Agricultural Department and Swindler & Sons Florist and Garden Center.

From left, Hugh O’Neill, John and Pam Myers look at the variety of peppers growing at the Wilmington College’s academic farm during the Tomadah Paradah on Satuday.

Dr. Rex Bueller, right, and Martha Jo Terrell Buller try one of 114 different tomatoes during the Tomadah Paradah on Saturday.

Ed Zoldak and Kim Stroop with some of the tomatoes growing at the Tomadah Paradah on Saturday. Stroop sported a fitting shirt that reads, “I love gardening. From my head tomatoes.”

Three Wilmington College Students were recognized and rewarded for helping to grow tomatoes at the academic farm that were bigger than submitted for the Heaviest Tomato contest. Winners of the contest were Tom Dalton came in first place with his 2.535-pound German strawberry, Clayton Cole in second place with his 2.53-pound German strawberry, and Guy Ashmore in third with a 2.105-pound mountain gold.
http://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/08/web1_DSC_0489.jpgThree Wilmington College Students were recognized and rewarded for helping to grow tomatoes at the academic farm that were bigger than submitted for the Heaviest Tomato contest. Winners of the contest were Tom Dalton came in first place with his 2.535-pound German strawberry, Clayton Cole in second place with his 2.53-pound German strawberry, and Guy Ashmore in third with a 2.105-pound mountain gold. John Hamilton | News Journal

People had plenty to try out at the Eighth Annual Tomadah Paradah on Saturday at Wilmington College’s farm. With over 100 colorfully named tomatoes there was no shortage of variety, in addition to a large variety of peppers. The event was co-sponsored by the college’s Agricultural Department and Swindler & Sons Florist and Garden Center.
http://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/08/web1_DSC_0466.jpgPeople had plenty to try out at the Eighth Annual Tomadah Paradah on Saturday at Wilmington College’s farm. With over 100 colorfully named tomatoes there was no shortage of variety, in addition to a large variety of peppers. The event was co-sponsored by the college’s Agricultural Department and Swindler & Sons Florist and Garden Center. John Hamilton | News Journal

From left, Hugh O’Neill, John and Pam Myers look at the variety of peppers growing at the Wilmington College’s academic farm during the Tomadah Paradah on Satuday.
http://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/08/web1_DSC_0477.jpgFrom left, Hugh O’Neill, John and Pam Myers look at the variety of peppers growing at the Wilmington College’s academic farm during the Tomadah Paradah on Satuday. John Hamilton | News Journal

Dr. Rex Bueller, right, and Martha Jo Terrell Buller try one of 114 different tomatoes during the Tomadah Paradah on Saturday.
http://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/08/web1_DSC_0480.jpgDr. Rex Bueller, right, and Martha Jo Terrell Buller try one of 114 different tomatoes during the Tomadah Paradah on Saturday. John Hamilton | News Journal

Ed Zoldak and Kim Stroop with some of the tomatoes growing at the Tomadah Paradah on Saturday. Stroop sported a fitting shirt that reads, “I love gardening. From my head tomatoes.”
http://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2017/08/web1_DSC_0482.jpgEd Zoldak and Kim Stroop with some of the tomatoes growing at the Tomadah Paradah on Saturday. Stroop sported a fitting shirt that reads, “I love gardening. From my head tomatoes.” John Hamilton | News Journal