Throwback Thursday: A pack of camels?


This photo is of an 1899 Street Fair and trade Carnival in Wilmington and is courtesy of the Clinton County Historical Society. The Clinton County History Center is now open Saturdays 10 a.m.-2 p.m. For more info, visit www.clintoncountyhistory.org; follow them on Facebook @ClintonCountyHistory; or call 937-382-4684. Thanks to Sue Allen, who told the News Journal that last week’s photo — of the zebras in front of the house on North South Street in Wilmington — is of the house where she and husband Hal Allen, professional portrait photographer, reside. The property now includes his studio. She added that, sometime in the past, a man named Frank Scofield lived there when he was murdered (not necessarily on-site). At one time, local attorney Judy Gano wrote a murder mystery about it.

This photo is of an 1899 Street Fair and trade Carnival in Wilmington and is courtesy of the Clinton County Historical Society. The Clinton County History Center is now open Saturdays 10 a.m.-2 p.m. For more info, visit www.clintoncountyhistory.org; follow them on Facebook @ClintonCountyHistory; or call 937-382-4684. Thanks to Sue Allen, who told the News Journal that last week’s photo — of the zebras in front of the house on North South Street in Wilmington — is of the house where she and husband Hal Allen, professional portrait photographer, reside. The property now includes his studio. She added that, sometime in the past, a man named Frank Scofield lived there when he was murdered (not necessarily on-site). At one time, local attorney Judy Gano wrote a murder mystery about it.


Clinton County Historical Society

These are some highlights from the News Journal 70 years ago on Monday, March 28, 1949:

National headlines

• Hard and soft coal miners report back to work Monday”

PITTSBURGH (AP) — “Hard and soft coal miners east of the Mississippi trooped back to work today to send coal flowing to the tipples in volume for the first time in two weeks … UMW President John L. Lewis called the stoppage a protest against Dr. James Boyd’s appointment as director of the U.S. Bureau of Mines. He also termed it a memorial to miners killed and injured last year.”

• “Liquor enforcement officers leads raids on Cincinnati clubs”

CINCINNATI (AP) — “The drive to put an end to gambling in establishement which hold retail liquor licenses picked up more steam in Cincinnati during the weekend. It all started last week when Walter Mitchell, chariman of the State Liquor Ontorl Board, declared handbook oeprations in taverns were more extensive than any ohter city in the state.

• “5,000 people storm department store”

BOSTON (AP) — ”Five thousand men and women stormed Filene’s basement today for a first-since-the-war sale of men’s suits, topcoats and overcoats at one price, $11.

• “Briefs from Training Camps”

TAMPA (AP) — “Ewell Blackwell took the wraps off his pitching arm yesterday for the first time in the Cincinnati Reds’ spring training. And he reported the result encouraging.”

Local news

• “One highway still closed by water”

“Only Route 730, near the Cowans Creek lake project, remained closed Monday after the heavy rains of the weekend, which totaled two-and-a-half inches in Wilmington … Water was over county roads in the vicinity of New Burlington, Clarksville and Westboro, but there was no damage. … The heavy rains of Saturday, however, flooded many fields in the county and water was across the CCC Highway in two places in Sabina for several hours. East Main Street was still a lake in front of the Amble Inn early Sunday.”

• “Arrest here nips crime wave in the bud”

“A new crime wave, planned by a man paroled from the Ohio Penitentiary in January, was ‘nipped in the bud’ Saturday morning by City Patrolman Leonard Adams a short time after (the suspect) entered the home of Mrs. Martin Spinks, 321 W. Main St., and taken $5.81. Joseph Elmer Wert, 32, Columbus, pleaded guilty before Mayor Robert C. Stephens Monday morning to breaking into the Spinks home and taking the money. … Police Chief Everett Downing said Wert confessed to taking the money. He told Downing he was en route to Cincinnati to obtain a gun and then he planned to stage some holdups in Cincinnati to obtain enough money to pay $110 due in April on his 1946 income tax.”

• William Sonaker, 85, of 120 Doan Street, died, as did Rev. Jason Biddlecum, 88, who was born “near Ogden.”

• Betty Lou Parker of Wilmington and Elizabeth Sayre of New Vienna “will be featured as instrumental soloists in the Wilmington College Aeolian Choir’s home concert.”

• The Wilmington Rifle Club defeated the Air City team from Dayton. Wilmington participants were G. Brown, D. Compton, J. Gillam, I. Carter and I. Cammack.

This photo is of an 1899 Street Fair and trade Carnival in Wilmington and is courtesy of the Clinton County Historical Society. The Clinton County History Center is now open Saturdays 10 a.m.-2 p.m. For more info, visit www.clintoncountyhistory.org; follow them on Facebook @ClintonCountyHistory; or call 937-382-4684. Thanks to Sue Allen, who told the News Journal that last week’s photo — of the zebras in front of the house on North South Street in Wilmington — is of the house where she and husband Hal Allen, professional portrait photographer, reside. The property now includes his studio. She added that, sometime in the past, a man named Frank Scofield lived there when he was murdered (not necessarily on-site). At one time, local attorney Judy Gano wrote a murder mystery about it.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2019/03/web1_1899-street-fair.jpgThis photo is of an 1899 Street Fair and trade Carnival in Wilmington and is courtesy of the Clinton County Historical Society. The Clinton County History Center is now open Saturdays 10 a.m.-2 p.m. For more info, visit www.clintoncountyhistory.org; follow them on Facebook @ClintonCountyHistory; or call 937-382-4684. Thanks to Sue Allen, who told the News Journal that last week’s photo — of the zebras in front of the house on North South Street in Wilmington — is of the house where she and husband Hal Allen, professional portrait photographer, reside. The property now includes his studio. She added that, sometime in the past, a man named Frank Scofield lived there when he was murdered (not necessarily on-site). At one time, local attorney Judy Gano wrote a murder mystery about it. Clinton County Historical Society