CAP names new mobility manager


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Katter

Katter


In conjunction with Ohio Loves Transit week, Clinton County Community Action Program, Inc. is pleased to announce that Allison Katter has been hired as the new Clinton County Mobility Manager. She will be responsible for increasing mobility and access to transportation for all residents of Clinton County.

Allison was born and raised in Wilmington and is a graduate of Wilmington High School.

She moved to Cincinnati after graduation, where she obtained a bachelor’s and a master’s from Xavier University. She was employed for 26 years for a large brokerage firm, where she worked as a trader, a trainer, and most recently as a project manager.

After many years in Cincinnati, she moved back to Wilmington in 2018 to care for her mother, Shirley.

“I’m excited about the challenges and potential rewards of my new role,” she said. “It will allow me to help the residents of Clinton County find ways to get where they need to go. It also gives me a great way to reconnect with my hometown community by helping others.

“Mobility independence is a significant quality of life issue. Without safe, reliable and affordable transportation, a person’s ability to flourish is greatly reduced.”

According to Jane Newkirk from Community Action, the position of mobility manager was through joint efforts with the Clinton County Regional Planning Office and community members working on the Age Friendly initiative. The process proved transportation to be a large barrier for Clinton County residents. Funding was provided by the Ohio Department of Transportation and a grant provided through Clinton County HealthFirst to meet the match requirements.

Allison’s introduction comes in advance of Ohio Public Transit Association’s (OPTA) Ohio Loves Transit Week, which is Feb. 10-14. Ohio’s public transportation systems are striving to meet the daily mobility needs of Ohio’s growing senior population, along with keeping up with the capital need to move workers, students, and those without access to their own vehicles. Public transportation in Ohio comes in many shapes and forms, from rail and streetcars, to buses, vans, and bikes.

Ohio’s transit systems also provide a vital link to thousands of people with disabilities, by providing rides to work, job training programs, medical appointments, and adult daycare facilities.

With the “baby boomer” generation aging, the needs for these services have grown, and both urban and rural transit agencies alike are working to ensure all citizens have the access to the transportation services they need to remain an active part of their community.

Katter
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