WC students share their work at 10th Annual Student Research Forum


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Not all research involved esoteric science-related studies. A trio of students incorporated baseball into their business administration research. From left, Trip Breen, swimming coach and director of aquatics, hears a presentation by Ben Hidy, Joel O’Brien and Jesse Reliford about the decreased weight of Major League baseballs and the cracking down on pitchers using pine tar and other substances that enhance their grip on the ball. Their statistical analysis of 30 batters and 30 pitchers since 2019 indicates both a reduction in the number of home runs hit and an increase in pitchers’ earned run averages.

Not all research involved esoteric science-related studies. A trio of students incorporated baseball into their business administration research. From left, Trip Breen, swimming coach and director of aquatics, hears a presentation by Ben Hidy, Joel O’Brien and Jesse Reliford about the decreased weight of Major League baseballs and the cracking down on pitchers using pine tar and other substances that enhance their grip on the ball. Their statistical analysis of 30 batters and 30 pitchers since 2019 indicates both a reduction in the number of home runs hit and an increase in pitchers’ earned run averages.


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WILMINGTON — No basketballs were bouncing or volleyballs being set for spikes or wrestlers scoring points on takedowns and escapes, yet Fred Raizk Arena was buzzing with activity Thursday as Wilmington College staged its 11th annual Student and Faculty Research Forum.

More than 50 individuals and teams displayed their research via posters and other presentation media and transformed the normally athletics-oriented venue into a strictly academic setting. The research projects spanned across academic disciplines as faculty, staff and students took time to peruse the presentations and learn first-hand from student researchers.

Dr. Provost Erika Goodwin, professor of athletic training, is a champion for the student research experience, which “really puts the College’s ‘hands-on learning’ into practice.”

“Doing research projects and disseminating their findings helps students close the loop on their entire academic experience in college,” she added. “Presenting helps students build those critical soft skills that are often lacking in the young professional: critical thinking, polished oral and written communication skills, collaboration and professionalism.”

Goodwin added it’s a valuable experience even if students may not want to — or have to — ever do a research project again. “That’s OK because it’s more important to me that they see the value and need of it, and appreciate the work that others do to develop the knowledge base in their respective fields.”

Special “Best in Class” awards went to: Agriculture — Chyann Kendel for her research on “Determining Factors in Successful Completion of an Agricultural Education Degree”; Communication Arts — Ti Harris, “How Psychoacoustics Influence Our Emotional Response to Visual Stimuli”; Biology — Jake Jubach with Dr. Amanda Rollins, assistant professor of biology, “Identification of Cytauxzoon felisin in Domesticated Feline in the Southwest Ohio Region”; Business Administration — Gabe Dolan, Wyatt Lykins, Sofia Thomas and Tim Triplett, “Talk of Shame Podcast Data Breakdown”; Sport Science — Hannah Hall with Dr. Erika Goodwin, professor of athletic training, Eric Dick, assistant professor of athletic training, and Jennifer Walker, associate professor of athletic training, “Effect of Rock Steady Boxing on Parkinson’s Patients”; and Social Sciences — Chloe Mason with Dr. Audrey Wagstaff, associate professor of social science and communication arts, “Learn, Live: Ascertaining Factors Related to Recruiting and Retention Among Agriculture and Social Science Students.”

President Trevor Bates spent several hours reviewing research projects and tagged these as “President’s Choice Award” winners: Sabrina Bowman Harrington, Communication Arts, “How NFT’s Are Revolutionizing the Landscape for Artists and the Rights to Their Work”; Damien Harris, Communication Arts, “Queerness and Its Place in Horror Films”; and Kayci Johnson with Dr. Amanda Rollins, assistant professor of biology, “Using Linear Programming to Select Herd Portfolio for Beef Sires.”

Selected for the “Best Student/Faculty Collaboration Award” was Jake Jubach with Dr. Amanda Rollins, assistant professor of biology, Biology, “Identification of Cytauxzoon felisin Domesticated Feline in the Southwest Ohio Region.”

“Coaches’ Choice Award” winners were Cassie Baird with Dr. Daryl Nash, assistant professor of agriculture, and Dr. Amanda Rollins, assistant professor of biology, Biology, “The Relationship Between Lactoferrin, Udder Health, and Calf Growth Rate in Beef Cattle”; and Hayley Suchland with Dr. Erika Goodwin, professor of athletic training, and Erik Dick, assistant professor of athletic training, Sport Sciences, “Effects of Tik Tok on the Mental Health of Men’s and Women’s Soccer Teams at One Institution.”

Not all research involved esoteric science-related studies. A trio of students incorporated baseball into their business administration research. From left, Trip Breen, swimming coach and director of aquatics, hears a presentation by Ben Hidy, Joel O’Brien and Jesse Reliford about the decreased weight of Major League baseballs and the cracking down on pitchers using pine tar and other substances that enhance their grip on the ball. Their statistical analysis of 30 batters and 30 pitchers since 2019 indicates both a reduction in the number of home runs hit and an increase in pitchers’ earned run averages.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2022/05/web1_Research-Baseball.jpgNot all research involved esoteric science-related studies. A trio of students incorporated baseball into their business administration research. From left, Trip Breen, swimming coach and director of aquatics, hears a presentation by Ben Hidy, Joel O’Brien and Jesse Reliford about the decreased weight of Major League baseballs and the cracking down on pitchers using pine tar and other substances that enhance their grip on the ball. Their statistical analysis of 30 batters and 30 pitchers since 2019 indicates both a reduction in the number of home runs hit and an increase in pitchers’ earned run averages. Submitted photo

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