Looking back at ‘18: September/October


News Journal



The Bennett Realty building on West Locust Street in Wilmington was destroyed by an electrical fire. But the company didn’t miss a beat, setting up temporary quarters for a few months before opening their office on Rombach Avenue. A line of early-to-rise Wilmington High School students welcomed motorists attending the 11th Annual Brake for Breakfast held early morning at the Foster J. Boyd, MD Regional Cancer Center. All four local high schools as well as community volunteers participated in the event.


Q ends run with Packers (Sept. 5)

Quinten Rollins was placed on injured reserve by the Green Bay Packers this weekend with a hamstring injury, likely ending his 2018 season, according to the team’s official website.

Rollins injured his hamstring in Green Bay’s preseason finale against Kansas City.

He later was designated “waived/injured” by the Packers, making him a free agent.

Late in the season he signed with the Arizona Cardinals and was placed on their practice squad, but after a few weeks he was released by the team.

Fire destroys building (Sept. 6)

WILMINGTON — Firefighters from three departments and other emergency personnel were on the scene about six hours Tuesday night into Wednesday morning at the fire which gutted Bennett Realty on West Locust Street.

“We were notified at 9:48 last night,” Wilmington Fire Department Chief Andy Mason told the News Journal Wednesday morning. “When we got here flames were through the roof in the front center of the building.

“Clinton-Warren Fire Department and Port William Fire Department provided mutual aid in fighting what ended up being an attic fire throughout the 7,000 square-foot building.”

Mason said the interior office areas sustained heavy water damage as well as ceiling collapse throughout.

“Very little was salvaged last night and the owner and his employees are on scene today removing what they believe they can save,” he said. “Damage estimates are reaching a million dollars at this time with a cause pointing to something electrical in the attic.

College ‘opens up’ (Sept. 12)

WILMINGTON — This year, Wilmington College is combining Homecoming, Alumni Reunion Weekend and Family Weekend into one big, festive and event-packed Saturday, Sept. 22.

With an expectation of breaking all attendance records for the annual, fall campus ritual, the College is making a special effort in welcoming the community to join alumni, students, parents, faculty and staff in the celebration.

Homecoming features such family-friendly activities as horse-drawn wagon rides, an inflatable game park, a food truck rally, music featuring a live DJ, Homecoming Court pageantry and, of course, a variety of Fightin’ Quaker sports.

Soldier on, off field (Sept. 15)

On the East Clinton High School football roster, Cameron Yankey is listed is a halfback and linebacker.

They probably should make room for another position or title — Yankey is a Private First Class in the United States Army.

For 10 weeks this summer, while his East Clinton football teammates were going through training under the watchful eye of head coach Jeremy Yankey and his staff, Cameron Yankey, the coach’s son, was going through basic training at Fort Jackson in Columbia, S.C.

“The physical part of basic training was not necessarily difficult for me,” Pfc. Yankey said during an interview on the Laurel Oaks campus adjacent to the Wilmington Air Park. “It was more the mental aspect of being a leader.”

The son of Stacey and Jeremy Yankey, Cameron left for basic training on May 21, three days prior to the end of his junior year at East Clinton.

He graduated later in the summer as Pfc. Yankey.

City, Army meet (Oct. 25)

WILMINGTON — The city is mulling its next steps after meeting with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Safety/Service Director Brian Shidaker was among city staff that attended an information-gathering session Monday at Caesar Creek Lake between the Army Corps and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR).

This meeting was to discuss the Army Corps’ operation and maintenance costs being billed annually — totaling hundreds of thousands of dollars — to the City of Wilmington related to Wilmington’s primary water source, Caesar Creek Lake.

“There was a very healthy exchange of information and points of view that will enable each of the parties involved to evaluate their contractual obligations,” Shidaker told the News Journal.

The city’s next step will be determined after Shidaker meets with their attorneys. This was the first face-to-face meeting current city staff has had with the Army Corps.

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The Bennett Realty building on West Locust Street in Wilmington was destroyed by an electrical fire. But the company didn’t miss a beat, setting up temporary quarters for a few months before opening their office on Rombach Avenue. A line of early-to-rise Wilmington High School students welcomed motorists attending the 11th Annual Brake for Breakfast held early morning at the Foster J. Boyd, MD Regional Cancer Center. All four local high schools as well as community volunteers participated in the event.
https://www.wnewsj.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2018/12/web1_bennett-fire.jpgThe Bennett Realty building on West Locust Street in Wilmington was destroyed by an electrical fire. But the company didn’t miss a beat, setting up temporary quarters for a few months before opening their office on Rombach Avenue. A line of early-to-rise Wilmington High School students welcomed motorists attending the 11th Annual Brake for Breakfast held early morning at the Foster J. Boyd, MD Regional Cancer Center. All four local high schools as well as community volunteers participated in the event.

News Journal